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Thread: Steam washer and dryer

  1. #1
    Senior Member skippy13's Avatar
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    Steam washer and dryer

    I'm looking for a new washer and dryer. I want a more energy efficient model and wonder if anyone has any experience with the newer steam washer and dryers. Are they worth the money?

    I will admit to a total OCD problem with imaginary cooties and the more real dust mites .

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    I have a bit of the OCD problem myself with the concept of cooties. I haven't seen the steam washer and dryer, but personally speaking, I want my clothes in a tub of water with soap being battered about until clean. The dryer sounds like an OK idea to me though. I live in a condo and they just replaced some of the top loading machines with energy efficient front loading (hellejulia!) and they work well while using less water than a normal machine.

  3. #3
    If you mean the LG: http://www.bestbuy.com/site/olspage....ci_sku=8651149
    There are 13 reviews.
    LG makes great products.
    "The sweet is not as sweet without the bitter"
    ~"Vanilla Sky"~

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    Senior Member skippy13's Avatar
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    Lorrie; I dont think I like the all in one model shown in your link. I would probably prefer the more traditional side by side models. The more things a machine can do, the more things can go wrong with it IMO.

    I like the idea that they heat the water to higher temps than normal. Especially for my white towels and washcloths that often have special needs due to the B&B effects of SCI. I want to be sure that these items are sanitized of any lingering cooties.

    Eileen; These appliances work in the traditional manner of the ordinary washer and dryer using water and soap. The steam is just used as part of a cycle to sanitize articles, and in the dryer is available to refresh clothing that does not need a full laundering, like your sweaters after theyv'e been stored for the summer and other fabrics like linen that tend to pick up wrinkles. Those of us who are grandmas could process our grandchilds stuffed animals and blankies to eliminate any cooties that they carry.

    I can see these appliances being great for those of us who suffer allergies. They help eliminate allergens.

  5. #5
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    Thanks for the clarification Skippy. You're right, I thought it skipped the whole water soap bashing in favor of just steam. What you are describing sounds ideal. Sigh.....it will be years, or never, before my condo invests in those. We are not allowed our own washers and dryers because of concerns over the buildings plumbing, so I guess I need to be grateful they finally bought a couple of front loading. Now I leave my untwisted coat hanger (also known as a clothes retrieval device) upstairs instead of fishing around the drum trying to locate that one sock that is plastered to the wall and that I can't see.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Wesley's Avatar
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    I have an LG washer with the steam clean option. It's a model WM2487H*M. they come out with a new model about every 10 minutes, but mine looks like the ones they currently sell. It's only a year or so old. We don't use the steam very much. My impression is it's a little bit of a gimmick. You can use it to remove clothing wrinkles and substitute it for hot water in some cycles. I played around with substituting steam for water and the water seemed to get things cleaner. They have a sanitation cycle that uses very hot water and (I think) the steam heater. It takes over two hours to do that cycle, but it will satisfy just about anyone's germ phobia. We use the more normal cycles. It does a lot of laundry with very little water and detergent. It's important to use the high-efficiency detergent.

    This is our second front loader washer. The first was a Bosch and it was nothing but a headache. Which leads me to my warning about these newfangled washing machines. They break, unlike the tried and true top loaders that can last decades. They have a lot of electronics and other gadgets that start pooping out, according to the repairman I know, within 6-7 years. it's hard though to argue against their water and energy efficiency. this is true for all the fancy appliances they've been pushing for the past five years or so. My mother just had the "computer" go out on her $1200 three-year-old refrigerator to the tune of $600. that's some pretty steep depreciation compared to traditional refrigerators.

    I think if I were buying one now, I would try not to be swayed by the bells and whistles of the high-end models and just get a basic front loader. Obviously, you want to get one with a sanitation cycle. I don't know if it's necessary to have the steam function in order to have that sanitary cycle. Most modern washers, like dishwashers, have built-in temperature boosters.

    also, seriously consider the extended warranties.

  7. #7
    Senior Member skippy13's Avatar
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    Thanks Wesley...That is just the kind of things I wanted to know. I agree, the more gadgets on anything, the more things can go wrong. I will look at other washers and dryers too, the ones that offer a temp boost sound good. Thanks again for the info.

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    Senior Member smokey's Avatar
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    We've gone through 2 expensive front loading/low water usage washing machines in the past 5 years. They only use around 20 gal/wash, use less electricity and they spin the shit out of the clothes so you don't have to dry them as long. But they seem to be louder, breakdown more easily, more expensive to buy and VERY expensive to repair. They come with so many buttons, settings bells and whistles that you'll never use and will never be able to repair yourself when they don't work (and at some point they will breakdown). I say just get a good, basic, simple machine and don't get sucked in by the look of the machine or the salesman's bullshit. Salesmen often work on commission and stores always have washers on sale. They are all basically the same; the washing machines work by using mechanical energy, thermal energy, and chemical action. Mechanical energy is imparted to the clothes load by the rotation of the agitator in top loaders, or by the tumbling action of the drum in front loaders. Thermal energy is supplied by the temperature of the wash bath. They make them too complicated these days. Bring back ye ol' washboards,lol.

    http://wize.com/washing-machines/t54432-water-usage

  9. #9
    Senior Member skippy13's Avatar
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    OK, I'm getting the same feeling here Smokey. The more I look and the more I research and the more I hear about these new-fangled things the more I think I will just go with a good quality basic set. I cant afford to have a lot of repairs and I certainly cant afford replacements every few years.

    You guys have once again talked me down from the ledge before I jumped off into the big bad unknown. Thank you very much.

  10. #10
    I've had a Maytag Neptune front loading washer for about 7 years without any major problems. I don't know if they still make it or not, but it's been a good washer. It's very quiet and does a good job of getting stuff clean.

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