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Thread: Staying in Japanese Capsule Hotels

  1. #1

    Staying in Japanese Capsule Hotels

    http://www.itravelnet.com/blog/labels/japan.html
    Staying in a Japanese Capsule Hotel

    Tokyo offers a wide range of accommodation options, but nothing is as quirky as a capsule hotel. The first capsule hotel opened in Osaka in 1979 and they can now be found in major cities across Japan. The capsule hotel idea has not taken off anywhere else though which makes for a unique Japanese accommodation experience.

    I stayed at the Capsule Inn Akihabara, in Akihabara, Tokyo. This area seemed like the appropriate place to stay in a futuristic capsule as Akihabara is the big electronics and manga shops area of Tokyo.

    Upon arrival you take your shoes off, as you would in a Japanese home, and place them into a shoe locker at the front entrance. Hand the locker key to reception and once you are done with check in formalities you are given another locker key attached to a wristband. The number on your wristband is your locker number and capsule number.

    Locker Room

    The hotel's slogan is "making the best of a small space", and they really mean it. The lockers aren't built for long haul travel. The locker is "L" shaped with room for hanging suits and jackets, and a shelf big enough for an overnight bag.

    Capsule hotels are mainly frequented by business people staying in town overnight and people who have missed the last train home, so accommodating for bulging backpacks and unwieldy wheelie bags is not usually required.

    If you have larger bags you can leave them on a luggage rack in the foyer. A security wire and padlock is provided.

    When you are ready for bed you go to the locker room and change into your usual nightwear. If you go to bed ala naturale, you are supplied with a yukata (Japanese bathing robe). You are also supplied with a bath towel which is about the size of a tea towel.

    <more>

  2. #2
    Moderator jody's Avatar
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    looks like a morgue or a laundromat. Id be worried the person above or below would hear me fart or snore. Id proly stay at one if ever I had the chance though

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    I read an article about these awhile ago in a travel magazine and thought they sounded great for tourists who simply need a place to sleep and who don't want to shell out enormous amounts of money just to have a bed. I would stay in one in a heartbeat if I could, as it would leave more money for shopping!!

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Eileen View Post
    I read an article about these awhile ago in a travel magazine and thought they sounded great for tourists who simply need a place to sleep and who don't want to shell out enormous amounts of money just to have a bed. I would stay in one in a heartbeat if I could, as it would leave more money for shopping!!
    Eileen,

    They should have capsule hotels here in the U.S., especially in airports. The London Gatwick Airport, for example, just opened its first "Yotel" on last year (see http://travel.nytimes.com/2007/07/15...ransyotel.html for more details). Yotel now has facilities at Heathrow and Amsterdam (Source).

    A premium cabin in a Yotel is really a minimum size hotel room that is big enough to fit a double bed and a private toilet/bath. A so-called "twin" is similar sized room but with bunk beds. A standard is just a cabin with a bed and a bathroom. These are much bigger than the Japanese capsule hotels. The cabins are 7-10 square meters.

    For you, if you are interested in staying in a capsule hotel in Tokyo, one of the only capsule hotel that accomodates women is

    http://hotels.lonelyplanet.com/hotel...e-P122819.html
    Lonely Planet Review

    * Wendy Yanagihara
    * Lonely Planet author

    One of the few capsule hotels in Tokyo that accommodates women, this one has a rejuvenating location along the Sumida River. Women have their own separate floor with its own bath and sauna facilities, and wonder of wonders, the Riverside accepts credit cards (with a small surcharge).

    Another for the 'Only in Japan' file, the capsule hotel makes the most of limited real estate and caters to those needing only a secure place to lay a weary head. These capsules are clean and quite comfortable: with TVs installed in a corner and enough room to sit up (or slouch up, if you're taller), they're cosy little compartments that might bring on some nostalgia for the forts and playhouses from your childhood. The baths here have views of the river, and there's a karaoke lounge if Asakusa's amusements fall short (which they will, once night falls). So, since Asakusa will hold more touristy thrall during the day than at night: check in late, have a bath, insert earplugs and tuck in for the night. Don't forget to bring your passport to check in, and be prepared for a complicated but painless check-in ritual.
    Here is a video of a capsule hotel that is also available for women in Roppongi

    http://www.geobeats.com/videoclips/j.../capsule-hotel

    I would love to get a review and recommendation from somebody who uses a wheelchair, concerning which capsule hotel is and have accessible facilities for wheelchair users.
    Last edited by Wise Young; 11-15-2008 at 02:20 PM.

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