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Thread: Supplement Review Thread

  1. #21
    I found this thread interesting and thought I would chime in. At 43 years old, I have now been lifting weights for 25 years (power lifting and body building, power-lifting ended after a blown disc at 21 while performing a squat). I have always been a believer in certain supplements (B complex, vitamin E, BCAA....). I currently take N.O.-Xlode (combo of vitamins, creatine, caffeine...) in addition to a few basic vitamins. The pre-work out supplements have definitely made a difference. I really noticed the difference in my late 30's (strength/endurance and body composition 6' 215lbs 25% body fat, should be below 20%). Below are articles I found interesting. I was particular interested in the effects of the pre-exercise supplement (the individuals where "experienced and trained"). Additionally, I found the article on DHEA interesting for several reasons. One, it did raise serum levels to that of a normal young adult. Two, it indirectly points out the need for exercise to take advantage of the supplementation. There are numerous articles on creatine and SCI but I would say the jury is still out on the effect. Studies that cite no significant effect were using either high level athletes (decreased room for improvement) or did not implement adequate exercise dosage (type, intensity, duration). I would also like to point out that I had several guest speakers (MD.PhD) in grad school that bashed several of these supplements. One (orthopedic surgeon) actually did a lecture on creatine and glucosamine-chondrotin sulfate. He said flat out that glucosamine and chondrotin sulfate were BS. “ How would oral supplementation of these two compounds find there way to an injured joint”. I took great pleasure in asking how his logic was any different than someone taking an aspirin for a headache. He was irritated but my advising professor (Ph.D, MPT, exercise physiologist) actually gave me a compliment. Anyway, I work with several individuals (various SCI levels) that take supplements. The only problem I have noticed (or they have reported) was stomach issues associated with type and amount of protein/creatine supplementation. There is definitely a need for more research on supplementation use and the multitude of issues that surround SCI (level of injury, classification of injury, age, ANS involvement, type/amount of supplement, exercise dosage....)

    J Strength Cond Res. 2008 May;22(3):874-82.

    Effect of a pre-exercise energy supplement on the acute hormonal response to resistance exercise.

    Hoffman JR, Ratamess NA, Ross R, Shanklin M, Kang J, Faigenbaum AD.

    Department of Health and Exercise Science, College of New Jersey, Ewing, New Jersey, USA. hoffmanj@tcnj.edu

    The effect of a pre-exercise energy sport drink on the acute hormonal response to resistance exercise was examined in eight experienced resistance trained men. Subjects were randomly provided either a placebo (P: maltodextrin) or the supplement (S: combination of branched chain amino acids, creatine, taurine, caffeine, and glucuronolactone). Subjects performed 6 sets of no more than 10 repetitions of the squat exercise at 75% of their 1 repetition maximum (1RM) with 2 minutes of rest between sets. Blood draws occurred at baseline pre-exercise, immediately post- (IP), 15 minutes post- (15P), and 30-minutes post (30P) exercise for measurement of serum growth hormone, total and free testosterone, cortisol, and insulin concentrations. Although significant differences were seen only at set 5, the total number of repetitions and training volume tended (p = 0.08) to be higher with S compared to P. Serum growth hormone and insulin concentrations were significantly higher at 15P and IP, respectively, in S compared to P. Results suggest that a pre-exercise energy S consumed 10 minutes before resistance exercise can enhance acute exercise performance by increasing the number of repetitions performed and the total volume of exercise. The enhanced exercise performance resulted in a significantly greater increase in both growth hormone and insulin concentrations, indicating an augmented anabolic hormone response to this pre-exercise S.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1...ubmed_RVDocSum


    Arch Intern Med. 2003 Mar 24;163(6):720-7.

    Effect of 1-year oral administration of dehydroepiandrosterone to 60- to 80-year-old individuals on muscle function and cross-sectional area: a double-blind placebo-controlled trial.

    Percheron G, Hogrel JY, Denot-Ledunois S, Fayet G, Forette F, Baulieu EE, Fardeau M, Marini JF; Double-blind placebo-controlled trial.

    Institut de Myologie, Paris, France.

    BACKGROUND: The age-related decline of dehydroepiandrosterone and its sulfate ester levels is thought to be related to the development of age-associated usual modifications, such as neuromuscular function impairments. It is often claimed that individuals can enhance their muscular capacity by boosting dehydroepiandrosterone levels through oral supplementation. However, to our knowledge, there have been no controlled studies on a significant number of individuals demonstrating positive effects on the neuromuscular system. This study determines if 1-year administration of a replacement dose of dehydroepiandrosterone, 50 mg/d, orally administered, could have a beneficial influence on several determinants of the muscular function altered during aging. METHODS: This work was completed within the frame of the DHEAge Study, which was conducted in France from March 1, 1998, to October 31, 1999. It was performed on 280 healthy ambulatory and independent men and women aged 60 to 80 years. The study design was a double-blind placebo-controlled trial. Dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate serum concentration, handgrip strength, isometric and isokinetic knee muscle strength, and thigh (fat and muscle) cross-sectional area were analyzed before and just after 12 months of placebo or dehydroepiandrosterone treatment. RESULTS: The results give evidence that dehydroepiandrosterone administration restores dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate serum concentrations to the normal range for young adults (aged 20-50 years). However, no positive effect inherent to dehydroepiandrosterone treatment was observed either on muscle strength or in muscle and fat cross-sectional areas. CONCLUSIONS: The compensation of the deficit of dehydroepiandrosterone during aging using a 50-mg/d dose does not induce beneficial effects on muscle state in healthy subjects. The conditions in which dehydroepiandrosterone could contribute to preserve or improve muscle strength and morphological features still need to be determined.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1...ubmed_RVDocSum


    Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2007 Feb;88(2):228-33.

    Nutrient supplementation post ambulation in persons with incomplete spinal cord injuries: a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled case series.

    Nash MS, Meltzer NM, Martins SC, Burns PA, Lindley SD, Field-Fote EC.

    Department of Neurological Surgery, Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, FL 33136, USA. mnash@miami.edu
    OBJECTIVE: To examine effects of protein-carbohydrate intake on ambulation performance in persons with incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI). DESIGN: Double-blinded treatment with washout and placebo crossover. SETTING: Academic medical center. PARTICIPANTS: Three subjects aged 34 to 43 years with incomplete SCI at C5-T4. INTERVENTIONS: Subjects walked to fatigue on 5 consecutive days. On fatigue, participants consumed 48g of vanilla-flavored whey and 1g/kg of body weight of carbohydrate (CH(2)O). Weekend rest followed, and the process was repeated. A 2-week washout was interposed and the process repeated using 48g of vanilla-flavored soy. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Oxygen consumed (Vo(2); in L/min), carbon dioxide evolved (Vco(2)), respiratory exchange ratio (RER: Vco(2)/Vo(2)), time (in minutes), and distance walked (in meters) were recorded. Caloric expenditure was computed as Vo(2) by time by 21kJ/L (5kcal/L) of oxygen consumed. Data were averaged across the final 2 ambulation sessions for each testing condition. RESULTS: Despite slow ambulation velocities (range, .11-.34m/s), RERs near or above unity reflected reliance on CH(2)O fuel substrates. Average ambulation time to fatigue was 17.8% longer; distance walked 37.9% longer, and energy expenditure 12.2% greater with the whey and CH(2)O supplement than with the soy drink. CONCLUSIONS: Whey and CH(2)O ingestion after fatiguing ambulation enhanced ensuing ambulation by increasing ambulation distance, time, and caloric expenditure in persons with incomplete SCI
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1...ubmed_RVDocSum

    Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2007 Jan 24;(1):CD004760.

    Creatine for treating muscle disorders.

    Kley RA, Vorgerd M, Tarnopolsky MA.
    Kliniken Bergmannsheil, Ruhr University Bochum,

    Department of Neurology, Buerkle-de-la-Camp-Platz 1, Bochum, Germany, 44789. rudolf.a.kley@ruhr-uni-bochum.de

    BACKGROUND: Progressive muscle weakness is a main symptom of most hereditary muscle diseases. Creatine is a popular nutritional supplement among athletes. It improves muscle performance in healthy individuals and might be helpful for treating myopathies. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the efficacy of oral creatine supplementation in muscle diseases. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group Register in May 2004 for randomised trials using the search term 'creatine'. We also searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library, Issue 2, 2005) using the same search term. We adapted this strategy to search MEDLINE (PubMed, from January 1966 to September 2005) and EMBASE (from January 1980 to May 2004). We reviewed the bibliographies of the randomised trials identified, contacted the authors and known experts in the field and approached pharmaceutical companies to identify additional published or unpublished data. SELECTION CRITERIA: Types of studies: randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials.Types of participants: people of all ages with hereditary muscle disease.Types of intervention: any creatine supplementation of at least 0.03 g/kg body weight/day.Primary outcome measure: change in muscle strength measured by quantitative muscle testing.Secondary outcome measures: change in muscle strength measured by manual muscle testing, change in energy parameters assessed by 31 phosphorous spectroscopy, change in muscle mass or a surrogate for muscle mass, adverse events. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two authors independently applied the selection criteria, assessed trial quality and extracted data. Some missing data were obtained from investigators. MAIN RESULTS: Twelve trials, including 266 participants, met the selection criteria. One trial compared creatine and glutamine treatment with placebo.In trials with 138 participants with muscular dystrophies treated with creatine, there was a significant increase in maximum voluntary contraction in the creatine group compared to placebo, with a weighted mean difference of 8.47% (95% confidence intervals 3.55 to 13.38). There was also an increase in lean body mass during creatine treatment compared to placebo (weighted mean difference 0.63 kg, 95% confidence intervals 0.02 to 1.25). No trial reported any clinically relevant adverse event.In trials with 33 participants with metabolic myopathies treated with creatine, there was no significant difference in maximum voluntary contraction between the creatine and placebo group (weighted mean difference -2.26%, confidence intervals -6.29 to 1.78). One trial reported a significant increase in muscle pain during high-dose creatine treatment (150 mg/kg body weight) in glycogen storage disease type V. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Evidence from randomised controlled trials shows that short- and medium-term creatine treatment improves muscle strength in people with muscular dystrophies, and is well-tolerated. Evidence from randomised controlled trials does not show significant improvement in muscle strength in metabolic myopathies. High-dose creatine in glycogenosis type V increased muscle pain.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17253521?ordinalpos=1&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez. Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_DiscoveryPanel.P ubmed_Discovery_RA&linkpos=4&log$=relatedreviews&l ogdbfrom=pubmed


    Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2002 Jan;83(1):19-23.

    Oral creatine supplementation enhances upper extremity work capacity in persons with cervical-level spinal cord injury.

    Jacobs PL, Mahoney ET, Cohn KA, Sheradsky LF, Green BA.

    Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, FL 33136, USA.

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the effects of short-term creatine monohydrate supplementation on the upper extremity work capacity of persons with cervical-level spinal cord injury (SCI). DESIGN: Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover design study. Consists of 2 treatment phases lasting for 7 days, separated by a 21-day washout period. SETTING: University research laboratory trial. PARTICIPANTS: Sixteen men with complete cervical-level SCI (C5-7). INTERVENTION: Subjects were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups and received either 20g/d of creatine monohydrate supplement powder or placebo maltodextrin powder for the first treatment phase; the treatment was reversed in the second phase. Incremental peak arm ergometry tests, using 2-minute work stages and 1-minute recovery periods, were performed immediately before and after each treatment phase (total of 4 assessments). The initial stage was performed unloaded, with power output progressively increased 10 watts/stage until subjects had achieved volitional exhaustion. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Peak power output, time to fatigue, heart rate, and metabolic measurements, including oxygen uptake (VO2), minute ventilation, tidal volume (VT), and respiration frequency. RESULTS: Significantly greater values of VO2, VCO2, and VT at peak effort after creatine supplementation (P <.001). CONCLUSIONS: Creatine supplementation enhances the exercise capacity in persons with complete cervical-level SCI and may promote greater exercise training benefits. Copyright 2002 by the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine and the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

    Drugs Aging. 2007;24(7):573-80.

    Glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate as therapeutic agents for knee and hip osteoarthritis.

    Bruyere O, Reginster JY.

    WHO Collaborating Center for Public Health Aspect of Osteoarticular Disorders, University of Liège, Liege, Belgium. olivier.bruyere@ulg.ac.be

    Osteoarthritis (OA), the most common form of arthritis, is a public health problem throughout the world. Several entities have been carefully investigated for the symptomatic and structural management of OA. This review evaluates published studies of the effect of glucosamine salts and chondroitin sulfate preparations on the progression of knee or hip OA.Despite multiple double-blind, controlled clinical trials of the use of glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate in OA, controversy regarding the efficacy of these agents with respect to symptomatic improvement remains. Several potential confounders, including placebo response, use of prescription medicines versus over-the-counter pills or food supplements, or use of glucosamine sulfate versus glucosamine hydrochloride, may have relevance when attempting to interpret the seemingly contradictory results of different clinical trials. The National Institutes of Health-sponsored GAIT (Glucosamine/chondroitin Arthritis Intervention Trial) compared placebo, glucosamine hydrochloride, chondroitin sulfate, a combination of glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate and celecoxib in a parallel, blinded 6-month multicentre study of patients with knee OA. This trial showed that glucosamine hydrochloride and chondroitin sulfate alone or in combination did not reduce pain effectively in the overall group of patients with OA of the knee. However, exploratory analyses suggest that the combination of glucosamine hydrochloride and chondroitin sulfate may be effective in the subgroup of patients with moderate-to-severe knee pain.For decades, the traditional pharmacological management of OA has been mainly symptomatic. However, in recent years, several randomised controlled studies have assessed the structure-modifying effect of glucosamine sulfate and chondroitin sulfate using plain radiography to measure joint space narrowing over years. There is some evidence to suggest a structure-modifying effect of glucosamine sulfate and chondroitin sulfate.On the basis of the results of recent randomised controlled trials and meta-analyses, we can conclude that glucosamine sulfate (but not glucosamine hydrochloride) and chondroitin sulfate have small-to-moderate symptomatic efficacy in OA, although this is still debated. With respect to the structure-modifying effect, there is compelling evidence that glucosamine sulfate and chondroitin sulfate may interfere with progression of OA.
    Last edited by wildwilly; 11-16-2008 at 01:07 PM.
    “As the cast of villains in SCI is vast and collaborative, so too must be the chorus of hero's that rise to meet them” Ramer et al 2005

  2. #22
    Senior Member lynnifer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wildwilly View Post
    One (orthopedic surgeon) actually did a lecture on creatine and glucosamine-chondrotin sulfate. He said flat out that glucosamine and chondrotin sulfate were BS. “ How would oral supplementation of these two compounds find there way to an injured joint”.
    I had the same thing said to me by a physican familiar with spinal cord injury .. but I find it does work. I don't take it regularly - but when I feel the shoulder pain coming on (which is rare anymore since 'fairly' regular theraband use).
    Roses are red. Tacos are enjoyable. Don't blame immigrants, because you're unemployable.

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  3. #23
    Senior Member Mona~on~wheels's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hardluckhitshome View Post
    I tried cutting meat out of my diet recently and it made me feel very sick. I had no energy and felt shaky/hungry a lot. It went away when I started eating meat again. I tend to think that the human body is designed for meat consumption.

    Have you noticed increased immune function since taking a daily high dose of vitamin c?
    Sean
    Sometimes I find it hard to believe myself, but since I started taking 1,000 mg Vit C, and other vitamins different ones off and on, I haven't been sick in any way for 16 yrs. Which is remarkable!!! No colds, no virus', no nothing! I had a terrible cold 17 yrs ago. Then a bad stomach virus a few months after the cold. I started taking the Vit C and gradually added more & more vitamins. Never sick in 16 yrs! I've been exposed to alot too. My aides have been sick while taking care of me. I told them to keep coming I won't get it! They've had colds, upset stomach, fever, chills, etc. The germs attacked me & I could feel myself kicking it. You know how you feel you're coming down with it, but 8-12 hrs later I could feel it lift. I lived in a nursing Home for 3 yrs. with sick patients, aides, and nurses. Nothing!
    I have 11 grandkids I've been around sick. Nothing! I must add my God watches over me too. With God, vitamins, and very healthy eating habits I'm been very blessed with a healthy life.

  4. #24
    Senior Member Mona~on~wheels's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lynnifer View Post
    I had the same thing said to me by a physican familiar with spinal cord injury .. but I find it does work. I don't take it regularly - but when I feel the shoulder pain coming on (which is rare anymore since 'fairly' regular theraband use).

    It works for my aide and her son (on swimming team) too.
    They swear by it.

  5. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by Mona~on~wheels View Post
    It works for my aide and her son (on swimming team) too.
    They swear by it.
    i swear by it. works for my shoulders big time
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  6. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by hardluckhitshome View Post
    I will have to try the garlique for the nightmares. I had never heard of that being used for such a thing. When I was in Israel, I asked about taking a calcium supplement, but was told that as a guy, calcium is not something I should be taking supplements of at this age. The person that told me this is something that we would call a nurse in the US, so I'm not sure how accurate that information is.

    Definitely give the garlic a try. Garlic cloves work the best, but people don't want to be around that. Let me know if it helps.

  7. #27
    Senior Member fishin'guy's Avatar
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    Okay, I've got a headache from trying to read and follow the one post with 50 yrs worth of testing and reporting. The only supplement I take right now is Vit D, Dr saw blood workup and I'm to take 50,000iu's once a week for 4 mo and an additional 2,000 daily. I know i should take some C, also, but I'm in a situation where I have Lupus, and as such I take a few immunosupressants, pred, also have a damn infection from my surg last yr and am on 2 antibiotics for the next 5-6 months. So Feuentes- any suggestions, I just started working out 3 weeks ago, doing arm cycleling, then over to a few leg workouts,They don't have any foot pedals my stupid feet will stay on. and then I go back to doing some more arm stuff.
    I have a few owie spots,like tendon on rt elbow outside top, and my gawd my hands are cramping on me someting terrible. I've lost about 15-17 lbs in three weeks, fat around chest and belly(damn pred has my man boobs looking respectible, if'n I was a girlie) and face jowles.
    So bottom line is I take about 12 pills Am am not really wanting to put alot of pressure on my kidneys, as they have problems usually, with lupus, but mine have been ok, liver is a bit swollen. So to start, ya think C, some B? I used to take just a daily generic one, like improved one a day, but quit about a yr ago. What do I need to replace for working out?
    Prolly just need to read above posts, but they're all over the place

  8. #28
    Senior Member fishin'guy's Avatar
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    Also, you must be independantly wealthy, or your marrying a vitamin heiress, this stuff cost's man!

  9. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by hardluckhitshome View Post
    Have you noticed increased immune function since taking a daily high dose of vitamin c?
    Sean
    I've noticed a big difference taking 2 g a day. I don't remember the last time I had a cold and I rarely get bladder infections anymore. I used to get them all the time and have a good cold once a year. I also eat much healthier than I used to and I don't drink soda anymore, so that may have a lot to do with it. But that's just me.
    C-5/6, 7-9-2000
    Scottsdale, AZ

    Make the best out of today because yesterday is gone and tomorrow may never come. Nobody knows that better than those of us that have almost died from spinal cord injury.

  10. #30
    Banned adi chicago's Avatar
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    organic food for me only ..home made.....still alive.
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