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Thread: August Poses Increased Risk for Spinal Cord Injuries; Leading Doctors and Researchers Urge Precaution and Hope for a Cure

  1. #1
    Senior Member Jeremy's Avatar
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    August Poses Increased Risk for Spinal Cord Injuries; Leading Doctors and Researchers Urge Precaution and Hope for a Cure

    August Poses Increased Risk for Spinal Cord Injuries; Leading Doctors and Researchers Urge Precaution and Hope for a Cure



    Story Filed: Monday, August 19, 2002 12:14 PM EST

    MIAMI, Aug 19, 2002 /PRNewswire via COMTEX/ -- August is one of the biggest months for spinal cord injuries, according to leading doctors at the Miami Project to Cure Paralysis, a Center of Excellence at the University of Miami School of Medicine. Doctors and researchers say that safety precautions are the best measures to prevent spinal cord injury (SCI) during the high-risk month of August.

    According to the Spinal Cord Injury Information Network, there are over 11,000 spinal cord injury cases reported each year. Nearly 25% of these cases occur during the month of August. Doctors at the Miami Project to Cure Paralysis say that August has one of the largest numbers of spinal cord injury cases reported due to increased participation in recreational activities.

    "Vacation and outdoor activities increase the incidence of spinal cord injuries in August," said Dr. Barth Green, an internationally recognized expert in the field of spinal cord injury and leading doctor at the Miami Project to Cure Paralysis research center. "While August tends to have higher incidence of SCI, we urge everyone to wear helmets, seat belts and use the proper sports safety equipment during recreational activities throughout the year."

    "Spinal cord injury primarily affects young adults. 55% of spinal cord injuries occur among persons in the 16 to 30 year age group," said Dr. Green.

    Additionally, raising awareness of spinal cord injury through public education, high-profile fundraising and special events is a goal and ongoing mission of the Buoniconti Fund to Cure Paralysis, the fundraising arm of the Miami Project.

    "The number of people affected by spinal cord injury is growing each year. We hope to raise awareness through government funding, private donations and fundraising so that the Miami Project can continue to make scientific breakthroughs that buoy the hopes of the millions of families throughout the world who cope with spinal cord injury," said Nick Buoniconti, Founder, the Buoniconti Fund.

    The Miami Project's research efforts have made successful advancements on improving the quality of life after injury such as treating pain, spasticity, autonomic functions, intraoperative monitoring and male fertility.

    "Our research in basic sciences is aimed at understanding and reversing the neurological consequences of the injuries. Our research in clinical sciences is aimed at evaluating and improving strategies that maximize function in persons living with spinal cord injuries today," said Dr. W. Dalton Dietrich, Miami Project Scientific Director.

    The research center's team of scientists are a broad spectrum of researchers, clinicians, and therapists from around the world brought together to attack the problem of SCI.

    "By uniting a broad range of expertise in the fields of electrophysiology, transplantation, surgical interventions, regeneration and molecular biology, the Miami Project team of scientists is accelerating the search for effective treatments for SCI," said Dr. Dietrich.

    Founded in 1985 through the vision and efforts of Dr. Barth Green and following the injury of football legend Nick Buoniconti's son Marc, the Miami Project to Cure Paralysis, located at the University of Miami School of Medicine, is the world's largest, most comprehensive research center dedicated to finding more effective treatments and, ultimately, a cure for paralysis that results from spinal cord injury.

    For more information or to make a contribution to the Miami Project to Cure Paralysis, please visit http://www.themiamiproject.org or call 1-800-STAND-UP.

    "If the wind could blow my troubles away. I'd stand in front of a hurricane."

  2. #2
    Yes, summertime is a time for many spinal cord injuries. At Bellevue Hospital, we use to brace for the influx of spinal and head injury cases starting June and holding our breath until Labor Day. Not only do people travel more and get into more car accidents but the number of thoughtless water-sport accidents and violence-related traumas increase during the summer months. As many people have pointed out, there is no cure for stupidity and violence. Wise.

  3. #3
    Senior Member alan's Avatar
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    Water sports accidents don't have to be thoughtless. Mine, for example. I was at a place I knew, and I knew the water depth was 4 - 5 feet. I especially did a flat racing dive for that reason. Unfortunately, I hit an old piling or waterlogged log (or Soviet submarine.) I knew not to dive straight down, so I didn't.

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