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Thread: Personal Injury Law Question

  1. #1

    Personal Injury Law Question

    I was injured in Matsumoto, Japan this past July. My accident happened because of faulty brakes on a bicycle a borrowed from the hotel I was staying at. As to be expected, my medical bills are out of control. Can I file a lawsuit against a Japanese hotel?

    --mike

  2. #2
    Sure, you can always file a lawsuit. The question you need to ask is how much is it worth to you? Are you talking about a U.S. based hotel (i.e. Marriott)? Do you know an international law attorney or is there one available near you? Many, many questions.

    Your details are pretty vague and hence the somewhat vague response. If you can find an attorney, the first consultation should be free. After talking to him/her I'd re-evaluate to determine if it's worth pursuing from a $$ and time perspective.

    Good luck.

  3. #3
    My question is regarding wether or not it's even possible to file against a Japanese owned hotel.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Timaru's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by captainwelch
    My question is regarding wether or not it's even possible to file against a Japanese owned hotel.
    Yes you can but be aware that the case will be heard in the defendant's country and decided under their legal system.

  5. #5
    Everything's possible. Time, money, value, and international law are the questions.

  6. #6
    So the next step would be to consult an attorney?

  7. #7
    Have a look first at whatever you may or not have signed concerning the borrowing of this bike. Seems odd to me that any hotel would not have something tucked in somewhere in the paperwork that exempts them from such responsibilities.

    You should seek out personal injury firms in your area on the internet, and often there is an opportunity to present your case to them for free over the website. If the atty thinks there is $$ to be gotten, they will let you know up front for free.

    Mary
    1FineSpineRN

  8. #8
    Hi CaptainWelch,

    There's a big difference in the legal "standard of care" an entity is expected to use between loaning and renting things. When money or profit is involved the standard of care is greatly increased. I'm not trying to scare you away from filing a suit but you'd have a much better case, if in fact the bicycle was faulty or unsafe, had you paid a rental fee for the bicycle instead of them merely extending you the favor of a loan. However, if it's common practice for the hotel to loan its customers bicycles then you can make the claim that it's part of their paid service. But if they were in effect only doing you a favor then their standard of care is much reduced. According to my years of watching Judge Judy!

    You should consult an attorney familiar with Japanese law.

    Bob.
    "Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a great battle." - Philo of Alexandria

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