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Thread: What should I expect with SCI at C6

  1. #1

    What should I expect with SCI at C6

    On Monday a close friend was in a terrible accident and has a fracture at C6 and damage to the spinal cord. Basically the Dr. said it was severly stretched and she has only 1% chance for use of her legs. What can anyone suggest we do to help her and what should we really expect the Dr.s and stuff don't say very much. Just today we were told she has some feeling in her legs!!!!

  2. #2
    Senior Member kate's Avatar
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    Hi, Jacquie--

    I'm so sorry you had to find us, but very glad you did. I'm married to a man who sustained a C-6 injury more than 3 years ago. (His initial prognosis was also horrendous.) It took me about 9 months to become a member of this community, and I haven't regretted it.

    You'll find a wealth of information and resources here; please take advantage of these people. They know firsthand (both as "caregivers" and as injured people) what you and your friend are up against.

    When was your friend's injury? Where is she now?

    You've asked for suggestions as to how you can help her . . . in our case, we set up a 24-7 hospital visitation schedule, in two hour shifts. My husband's vocal cords were damaged by the surgery that stabilized his neck, so he was unable to speak or swallow for more than two months--which made it important that someone who knew him always be there to speak on his behalf.

    He also had very early return of sensation (within 24 hours of injury), and has also had a lot of return of function--ongoing return, in fact.

    Please let us know how we can help, and welcome again.

    kate

  3. #3
    Her accident was Monday- Tueday she went into surgery to stablize her injury. On Wednesday she was trying to form words, but is on a respiratory, they hope she is off of it by this weekend. Everyday she is making great progress. The swelling in her face is almost completely gone and she is trying to communicate. and is very frustrated at this time. Has your husband regained any use in his legs? Is he fully using a wheelchair? I just don't know what to expect and as you know the Drs still pretty closed mouth at this early stage about the rehab and stuff. She is at a level 2 tramua center in a ICU neuroscience tramua unit, the hospital also is a CARF rehab center.

  4. #4
    Your friend may qaulify for the Pro-cord trial at Craig Hospital. Here is the contact information:
    ProCord Clinical Trial Contact Information



    If you are interested in finding out eligibility for the ProNeuron clinical trial please contact their call center. Their contact information is as follows:
    Clinicall
    1-866-539-0767 (U.S.toll-free) or 1-506-652-3486
    1-866-214-7078 (fax)
    clinical.trial@proneuron.com
    The call center will conduct a brief initial scree (was the injury within 14 days, is the patient between 16 and 65 and was the injury non-penetrating).If the patient is still eligible, an email is sent to Proneuron and the Study Coordinator for the site where the patient will be treated (for now Craig Hospital or Israel) that contains name, age, date of injury, location and contact info. The call center also sends a release of medical information form. The Study Coordinator then contacts the family and MD for a more in-depth medical screen. If the patient still appears eligible, they are flown to one of ProNeurons clinical sites, screened on-site, then enrolled if eligible.

    To locate additional information on ProCord please review the following website: http://www.proneuron.com/ClinicalStudies/index.html

    "A hero is an ordinary individual who finds the strength to persevere and endure in spite of overwhelming obstacles"....C. Reeve 1998


  5. #5
    Jacquie-
    Welcome to CareCure. I'm sorry you had to find us too. My 'soulmate' sustained a c6 fracture about 2 years ago. I think the initial prognosis on injury is usually 'not good'. He was on a ventilator right after surgery too. The road is long and hard but, he has had great return of function. He does not use a wheelchair anymore. He uses a cane. Unfortunately, everything is possible with SCI. Good and Bad. No injury is the same as another. Use this site to ask questions, and tell your friend about it as soon as possible. The people here have been through it all. They offer a lot of advice and moral support.
    Hang in there with your friend. She's lucky to have you.
    Soulmate

    We are all faced with a series of great opportunities... Brilliantly disguised as impossible situations.

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