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Thread: Paralyzed & Pregnant on Discovery Health

  1. #21
    Well, I've had a c-section before being injured and I'm scheduled for another on Monday for my second child. I'll let you guys know how different the two are with regards to recovery. The first I was not able to leave for 4 days and it took about 2 weeks before I was fully back on my feet again. So fingers crossed everything goes as planned and the recovery won't be too bad this time around.

  2. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by cass
    been there, done that, as a c7 quad. read above edited post. they no longer do what you say. a small incision above the pelvic. cause of my paralysis, i wasn't even put under, at my insistence.

    never breast fed either and my son has almost never been sick. he was never sick as an infant. first threw up at 3.
    I had no choice, both of my c sections were necessary to save me and my baby. I had pre-eclampsia and it got much worse when I went into labor, it had to be done. What did I say that they no longer do? I also had the small incision uterine incision, it'a about 6 inches long. I was awake, had a spinal. It's still abdominal surgery and you still need to recover from it along with taking care of a newborn.

  3. #23
    My point is, 'Best' is an ambiguous term. Everything considered, it isn't always best.

    Quote Originally Posted by I Care
    All I said was, it's best, stated it as a fact, which it is. I don't care what method any mom chooses to birth or feed their young.

  4. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by 05survivor
    Well, I've had a c-section before being injured and I'm scheduled for another on Monday for my second child. I'll let you guys know how different the two are with regards to recovery. The first I was not able to leave for 4 days and it took about 2 weeks before I was fully back on my feet again. So fingers crossed everything goes as planned and the recovery won't be too bad this time around.
    Wish you all the best and a healthy youngling.

  5. #25
    How can anybody argue that "breast is not best"? Lactation is the most primal of body functions-the very purpose of a female breast, human or animal. Although it is not always possible for a variety of reasons, it should always be the very first option considered. Human baby = human breast milk, how could it be wrong? The fact that women are not immediately supported and encouraged to breast-feed is sad and shocking, not the "hippie mama's" pushing as hard as they can to change the tides and bring lactation back to its rightful place as the most natural way to nurish your baby.

    Please understand that I know how difficult and sometimes impossible it is to breast-feed, and luckily there are healthy alternatives available. I also know how devastating it is for some people to not be able to breast-feed their children. I struggled with it myself, supplementing and finger feeding for weeks before her my daughter and I established a good nursing relationship-but the rewards are worth it for me, and still are (at 26 months). I just can't believe that women who are able to breast-feed choose not to for anything other than health risks to themselves or their babies.

    Before the invention of formula, there were no alternatives-everyone breast-fed, or found a way to get the human breast milk to their babies.
    "We must become the change we want to see in the world." Gandhi

  6. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by cass
    why not, exactly?
    For all the reasons that another poster has already stated, I believe it is a bad thing that so many medical professionals have been pushing c-sections on women.

    they use a very small cut, outta hospital in 2 days, no long labor. kid is fine, mom even better.
    I suppose "very small" is a relative term as quite often it must be big enough to remove a full term infant. You seem to be making light of what is in fact abdominal surgery because you perceive me to be in total opposition to c-sections. I don't know if I am misreading you, but if that is what you got from my first post, then you have definitely misread me.

    mayo clinic:

    Sometimes a Caesarean birth (C-section) is safer for mother or baby than is a vaginal delivery.
    Sometimes it is, but not always and even when it is the best choice in a specific situation, c-sections still carry risks and take longer to recover from than vaginal deliveries. As is noted on the page you linked to.

    C.

  7. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by Cherry
    I can't tell you the amount of horror stories I've heard re. tearing of the perineum, multiple stitches, forceps complications etc.
    Of course all of those things are possible during vaginal deliveries, but are you really promoting c-sections as generally preferable? Or are you merely responding to what you feel is my rejection of them?

    I find it disheartening to see the 'breast is best' mentality jumping on board with their guilt trips.
    Where are you getting this "guilt trip" thing from? Can you quote anything specific as I haven't read anything in this thread that comes across that way regarding c-sections.

    An expectant mother does not always have a choice as to the delivery plan, but if she does, she should be able to make an informed decision alongside her physician's guidance sans the unecessary pressures from judgemental individuals - largely women and some not even mothers themselves.
    First of all, we totally agree that women don't always have choices and that they should make informed decisions. Obviously I didn't spell it out in my first post, but the fact that a lot of women are NOT fully informed, but are pressured into c-sections is exactly what I was thinking of when I said that the increase in this procedure is a bad thing. Secondly, you are the only one who is being "judgmental" here based on your misapprehension of my position and, it appears to me, that of the woman posting as "I Care." Lastly, I just have to say how tired I am of hearing people dismiss opinions about and information regarding parenting based solely on whether they believe that said info is coming from someone who is a parent. I bet you wouldn't do that if you thought the opinion you were hearing fully concurred with yours.

    Organically, of course breast milk is preferable and the ideal.
    So everybody agrees. Cool.

    What is shameful is how the Nurse Ratchet and Earth mother types bully new mothers into believing that they are somehow inadequate if they can't yield the supplies, cope with the pain/routine or indeed just opt out of breast-feeding for a number of other reasons. I've been there, it's shocking.
    I'm sorry if you were ill treated by some people regarding your parenting choices, but that doesn't justify you taking it out on anyone here. No one has even hinted at looking down on women who are unable to breastfeed their babies. Just as no one has voiced any negative judgment toward women who have c-sections.

    'Best' is an ambiguous term.
    No, it isn't. And you already agreed that breastfeeding is ideal. What you're arguing against is the idea that anybody posting here doesn't know that not all situations are ideal for delivery or for breast feeding. It's an unnecessary argument though, as I am certainly aware of that fact and, from what I've read, so is the other poster.

    C.

  8. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by Tiger Racing
    For all the reasons that another poster has already stated, I believe it is a bad thing that so many medical professionals have been pushing c-sections on women.


    I suppose "very small" is a relative term as quite often it must be big enough to remove a full term infant. You seem to be making light of what is in fact abdominal surgery because you perceive me to be in total opposition to c-sections. I don't know if I am misreading you, but if that is what you got from my first post, then you have definitely misread me.


    Sometimes it is, but not always and even when it is the best choice in a specific situation, c-sections still carry risks and take longer to recover from than vaginal deliveries. As is noted on the page you linked to.

    C.
    well, it's called a bikini cut. and no dr. pushed a c-section on me, yet on this very thread a poster stated s/he thought that's all quads could do. definitely misinformed. it was fully expected, at loma linda (surely, C., you are familiar with that CA medical facility) in 1992, that I would have a normal vaginal delivery.

    and yes, the bikini cut is a lot smaller than my emergency c-section which delivered a healthy 6 lb baby. as stated above, the emergency had nothing to do with paralysis. and, frankly, having been through it and nearly died due to blood loss, i would choose c section, planned.

    btw, in reference to size, is the typical vaginal opening 6 inches? hmmm. why does one suppose they cut it to avoid tearing? frankly, i've heard more horror stories on that procedure.

    as cherry said, these are personal choices and the mom gets to choose. the mom doesn't need any of our advice, let alone fear mongering.
    Last edited by cass; 10-07-2008 at 02:37 AM.

  9. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by Tiger Racing
    Of course all of those things are possible during vaginal deliveries, but are you really promoting c-sections as generally preferable? Or are you merely responding to what you feel is my rejection of them?


    Where are you getting this "guilt trip" thing from? Can you quote anything specific as I haven't read anything in this thread that comes across that way regarding c-sections.


    First of all, we totally agree that women don't always have choices and that they should make informed decisions. Obviously I didn't spell it out in my first post, but the fact that a lot of women are NOT fully informed, but are pressured into c-sections is exactly what I was thinking of when I said that the increase in this procedure is a bad thing. Secondly, you are the only one who is being "judgmental" here based on your misapprehension of my position and, it appears to me, that of the woman posting as "I Care." Lastly, I just have to say how tired I am of hearing people dismiss opinions about and information regarding parenting based solely on whether they believe that said info is coming from someone who is a parent. I bet you wouldn't do that if you thought the opinion you were hearing fully concurred with yours.


    So everybody agrees. Cool.


    I'm sorry if you were ill treated by some people regarding your parenting choices, but that doesn't justify you taking it out on anyone here. No one has even hinted at looking down on women who are unable to breastfeed their babies. Just as no one has voiced any negative judgment toward women who have c-sections.


    No, it isn't. And you already agreed that breastfeeding is ideal. What you're arguing against is the idea that anybody posting here doesn't know that not all situations are ideal for delivery or for breast feeding. It's an unnecessary argument though, as I am certainly aware of that fact and, from what I've read, so is the other poster.

    C.
    Tiger, please show me where I personally promoted 'c-sections as preferable'? If you'll re-read you will see that I merely gave the opinion of someone far better placed to comment than myself and yes, a handful of the potential complications needed to be stated. Regardless, depending on the expectant mother's circumstances, c-sections absolutely can be. You did not show that you appreciated that in your opening post. Also, honestly - must you take everything as a personal attack? I did not specifically refer to this thread when commenting about the guilt trip that is so often placed upon new mothers over their 'choice' of birthing method, their feeding plans and their hopes to return to employment etc etc. Once again you are instantly on the defensive, but maybe this is proof that you do indeed fall into the aforementioned category of people? That's your prerogative of course, I just don't happen to agree with the scaremongering that I know goes on, especially from those who have never even carried a child, let alone cared for their own newborn. It goes without saying that being pressured into any birth plan is a bad thing if indeed that is where you were coming from with your first post, but you didn't specify that at all.

    My comment about those who have not carried or reared children themselves, yet who push their ideals upon those who have and to the point of making them uncomfortable, still stands. You can bear witness to a million births, read a library of textbooks and case studies on the topic and nanny for the brady bunch but the fact remains, if you have received unbiased guidance throughout your pregnancy and onward (with a little help from your instincts also), as the mother of your child you are generally placed to dictate what is best for yourself and baby. Sure, guidance, debate and sharing opinions should always be encouraged, but no-one has the right to add unecessary stress or interfere and impose their own preferences about how the child should be reared on a fully capable mum. Obviously I am referring here to Mothers who have their children's best interests at heart. Intervention is obviously always required otherwise. Whether a person agrees with my stance or not, once an individual has had a child of their own they can obviously talk from experience and just not from the sidelines. Thanks for what you think is a revelation but I'm not judging here, I'm talking from experience.

    Regarding whether or not breast milk really is best, if you looked beyond your own beliefs you would uncover a broad range of opinions about that. Some experts believe that particular formulas today are on a par. But aside from this, what of the potential drawbacks to breastfeeding? These are hardly ever discussed and that isn't right. I remember reading about a nutritionist who was commenting on her experiences with numerous breast-fed children. She said they were being brought in half-starving. When I said that the word 'best' is ambiguous - it really is. It is entirely dependant on circumstance. Some mothers are not able to fully devote themselves to their newborn as they are so hung up on getting a handle on such an 'essential function'. In turn the child is left feeling unhappy and unfulfilled. The anxiety caused can hinder the bonding process and mothers can begin to associate their child with nothing more than an upsetting, unachievable and humiliating feeding regime. Overtired mothers can not always function ideally for their baby. Feelings of isolation and loneliness can negatively impact the child. Depending on your milk yield, the child can be slow to reach weight milestones. What about mothers who, despite warnings, have to take medication that can infuse their milk supplies? I really could go on at length but contrary to what you say, it isn't that obvious that points such as these have ever been considered by some posters in this thread. You assume too much. Anyway, I think that the kind of breast 'fascism' that can exist in maternity and community support units can do more harm than good.

    'Taking it out on anyone here'? Could you exaggerate any more? You chose to take what I said personally as usual and I would ask that you exercise less close-mindedness when responding to my posts. I was not exclusively referring to comments in this thread. Not every countering opinion comes with loaded intent you know! As for posters commenting negatively regarding women who choose to have c-sections or who choose not to breastfeed, perhaps not directly, but with your

    ''C-sections have become entirely too common in this country, whether they be for AB women or disabled women. This is not a good thing.''

    comment, you make your disdain for the procedure pretty clear without voicing that your bias cannot be justly applied to those who have no alternative.

    Don't be sorry about the lame attempts of stimulating guilt that were placed upon me personally - it was actually a positive experience because my answers and questions meant that the two staff members in question had to somewhat rethink the way they approached the subject, which with any luck can only be a good thing for the next mum. We need a huge influx of fully informed, forward thinking and unbiased staff in these centres to provide the adequate level of support that all proacrtive mothers deserve.
    Last edited by Cherry; 10-07-2008 at 05:10 AM. Reason: Double bracket

  10. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by Cherry
    Regarding whether or not breast milk really is best, if you looked beyond your own beliefs you would uncover a broad range of opinions about that. Some experts believe that particular formulas today are on a par. But aside from this, what of the potential drawbacks to breastfeeding? These are hardly ever discussed and that isn't right. I remember reading about a nutritionist who was commenting on her experiences with numerous breast-fed children. She said they were being brought in half-starving. When I said that the word 'best' is ambiguous - it really is. It is entirely dependant on circumstance. Some mothers are not able to fully devote themselves to their newborn as they are so hung up on getting a handle on such an 'essential function'. In turn the child is left feeling unhappy and unfulfilled. The anxiety caused can hinder the bonding process and mothers can begin to associate their child with nothing more than an upsetting, unachievable and humiliating feeding regime. Overtired mothers can not always function ideally for their baby. Feelings of isolation and loneliness can negatively impact the child. Depending on your milk yield, the child can be slow to reach weight milestones. What about mothers who, despite warnings, have to take medication that can infuse their milk supplies? I really could go on at length but contrary to what you say, it isn't that obvious that points such as these have ever been considered by some posters in this thread. You assume too much. Anyway, I think that the kind of breast 'fascism' that can exist in maternity and community support units can do more harm than good.

    Just curious as to where you got this info? I read this a number of times and tried very hard to understand your points, but I can't. I find most of what you have said above, just myth stemming from possible ignorance about the subject.

    1. Kids won't die if given formula, obviously. But there are NONE that are on par with breastmilk, just not gonna happen. We are mammals, we have breasts to feed our young, God made us that way, no powder that you mix with water and put in a plastic container can even come close. Now, that is a fact.

    2. You said some mothers can't fully devote themselves to their newborn? Well...that is just sad, isn't it? If a child is left unhappy and unfullfilled, it is probably due to that, wouldn't you say?

    3. All new mothers are overtired...it comes with the territory. Consequently, not having to get up to mix formula and wash bottles will give you more rest.

    4. If a mom wants to breast feed, then she needs to be aware of what she takes and eats, just like when she was pregnant.

    5. It appears you have some phobia or something .....humilitating feeding regime? breastfeeding a baby?

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