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Thread: Ever sit in the chair?

  1. #41
    Senior Member TimN's Avatar
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    Don't do it! I was always leary to use others' crutches and etc throughout my life so naturally sitting in someone's wheelchair wasn't something I wanted to do. When I was in college I did landscaping and of everything I'd ever done in life I felt it was my calling. I could be my own boss, express my creativity, work outside, see my accomplishments at the end of each day.... I could go on, and on, but back to the subject. I took a job for an older gentleman who was confined to a wheelchair. I not only did the original job, but sort of became his handyman as I liked him and he liked my work-ethic and my cost, as I always charged him little. Anyway, even though his wife disliked it, he loved to be in his truck and ride through his fields which were now tended by his neighbor. I'd pick him up, put him in the seat and away he'd go. He used an old cane to push the accelerator and brake, but truly only idled around. One day it began pouring rain and he idled up to a stop near the barn, which was far from his powerchair. I thought little of it and began driving it over to the truck by walking beside it and using the control. He rolled down the window and basically barked at me to sit in it, put it in high gear and to hurry or his seat would be soaked. I didn't want to sit in the damn thing, but I didn't want his seat and etc being wet either so I did. I'll never forget the feeling that went through my body immediately upon sitting in that chair. Afterwards he reminded me, as he often did, how I should appreciate my legs because there was nothing like them, etc, etc. That was on a Friday afternoon around 3. I drove home that night, and had my accident Sunday at around 3. I've been in a chair every since. That old man, Mr Dewit, traveled with his wife the 6 hrs to visit me and could hardly even talk to me through his tears. I still think of the feeling I had when I sat in his chair.

    Tim

  2. #42
    If I were an actor, I don't think I could lie in a casket. I dont care how big the paycheck. There must be a connection in this phobia somehow. Its a situation you don't want. Your options have a way of limiting themselves. Otherwise, I can't see either wheelchairs or caskets being big sellers.

  3. #43
    Senior Member
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    We used to let our kids drive the chair around all over the place. We were younger then! Our grandkids wheel around in the manual chair and have gone so far as to duck tape their fingers together and their legs as well to see what it feels like to be like their Bacca (grandpa). I don't know if that is healthy play or not On the positive side they are not intimidated or shy around other people in chairs because according to their world view it's just another kind of normal.

    "We only become what we are by the radical and deep-seated refusal of that which others have made of us."~~Sartre

  4. #44
    Moderator Obieone's Avatar
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    {{{{{BUMP}}}}}

    Found this old thread and thought it would be interesting to give it another life for the newer members in case someone wanted to add their 2 cents. . We've discussed it all here haven't we !! This was a good discussion.

    Obieone
    ~ Be the change you wish to see in the world ~ Mahatma Gandi


    " calling all Angels ...... calling all Angels ....walk me through this one .. don't leave me alone .... calling all Angels .... calling all Angels .... we're tryin' and we're hopin' cause we're not sure how ....... this .... goes ..."
    Jane Siberry

  5. #45
    An interesting subject that I never thought about, thanks, Obieone.
    I sit in my wife's chair every evening, as we read to one another while doing her BP. I don't think anything of it, except that it's also a good way to keep a check on the Roho's inflation. Sitting in it is by far the easiest way to move it around the house when she's not in it.
    It's a tool, nothing more.
    - Richard

    addendum:
    When I was small in the early '50s, my mother had polio. I don't remember being actively discouraged from sitting her wheelchair, but I do have this vague memory of something akin to fear about being in that chair. I don't think we ever tried to sit in it.
    Last edited by rfbdorf; 01-04-2009 at 01:24 PM. Reason: added after reading hlh's post below

  6. #46
    This is an interesting old thread, and the responses are different then I expected.

    My father was hospitalized for quite awhile after his accident + rehab > 6 months. While he was in rehab, there were a few times my mom or one of my brothers might sit in the chair.... perhaps because there weren't enough chairs in the room to sit in, or maybe we wanted to move it out of the room by pushing it.

    If we did this, my father would get very quiet... and was clearly very upset. He could cry a little....

    He was so devastated by his own injuries, that in his mind, the only worse thing he could imagine was his wife or child getting injured (or my mom's arthritis becoming more debilitating with time) and being confined to a chair. The image of one of us sitting in his wheelchair was extremely scary and upsetting to him for this reason.

    He never told us not to sit in the chair. But I think that Pavlovian conditioning has kept us from sitting in his wheelchair since that time...

  7. #47
    Thanks Obie, it is interesting reading other views...My son has a power chair and it took me forever to learn how to drive it...

    One of probably the nastiest things I have done in my life (and would do again...) was early with the injury...My son stayed in what was my grandkids play room...very small...room for the bed and in order to get the chair and hoyer in there you had to move the bed against the wall and take the bed table out of the room...

    So not to get off topic I will simply say the woman who was responsible for the wreck...did help 1 night a week for a few weeks...that was during the time my son needed to be turned every couple hours and I was so sleep deprived I would go upstairs the minute she walked in the door...so, one night I moved the wheelchair next to the bed and there was not room for the chair she usually moved into the room..I told her to sit in it, it was too much trouble to move it out of the room...she friggin freaked after just a couple minutes...and then of course the fight of the century started...to this day she has never been back...I remember her saying "but it is so uncomfortable, I can't sit in it" from there you can only imagine the words of a mother so tired, so overwhelmed and sooo sad...I swear, had she not ran out the door I think I had the strength to have killed her...but, that was then...and this is now...and yes, I can drive that chair without running into anything...and I can even laugh when we are out in a parking lot and my son puts it in high gear and becomes a speed racer...

    I was a little sad reading this 5 yr post and wondering where the poster's are today...and how they are doing...and so thankful for the "old timers" who still give from their heart and share their experiences. I can only say Thank You! judy

  8. #48
    Judy - Wow, I couldn't imagine any other response to a statement like that!
    ...and my wife and I do laugh sometimes when she puts the chair in its fastest mode and races down an aisle in the store, leaving me behind - it's not only kids!
    - Richard

  9. #49
    Richard...he'll be 40 this year, lol...not a kid!

  10. #50
    ...it's all relative!
    but then I should have caught that, seeing your mention of grandkids

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