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Thread: Sleep disorder as a symptom

  1. #1

    Sleep disorder as a symptom

    I had an accident last 06Sep03 in the Philippines which left me deaf and disabled, plus I suffer from what my first neurologist then termed it as Myoclonus from the brain trauma. My symptoms are:
    I couldn't control my right hand
    I couldn't control the tips of my fingers of my left hand (though I could control it)
    I couldn't control my right toes
    I'm sleep-deprived. => This is my primary concern now. I've read that it's symptom, not age, related. Most likely it has something to do with my accident. My current sleep now only averages 3 hours. I sleep at 8, then I wake up at 11. My target now is to normalize my sleep, for even if my eyes are really sore, I still couldn't fall asleep.
    I feel if I'm prescribed the right muscle-disorder drug, I would regain control of my hands, and get adequate sleep.
    Maybe a web can come up with a site where you can enumerate the symptoms, and the site can provide possible diagnoses, you print them out, and present it to your doctor.

  2. #2
    Are you overweight? Has anyone ever stated you snore? Has the accident affected your breathing? Accidents/injuries can magnify sleep apnea.
    You may want a sleep study to rule apnea out.


    Quote Originally Posted by pian
    I had an accident last 06Sep03 in the Philippines which left me deaf and disabled, plus I suffer from what my first neurologist then termed it as Myoclonus from the brain trauma. My symptoms are:
    I couldn't control my right hand
    I couldn't control the tips of my fingers of my left hand (though I could control it)
    I couldn't control my right toes
    I'm sleep-deprived. => This is my primary concern now. I've read that it's symptom, not age, related. Most likely it has something to do with my accident. My current sleep now only averages 3 hours. I sleep at 8, then I wake up at 11. My target now is to normalize my sleep, for even if my eyes are really sore, I still couldn't fall asleep.
    I feel if I'm prescribed the right muscle-disorder drug, I would regain control of my hands, and get adequate sleep.
    Maybe a web can come up with a site where you can enumerate the symptoms, and the site can provide possible diagnoses, you print them out, and present it to your doctor.
    And the truth shall set you free.

  3. #3
    Senior Member lynnifer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pian
    Maybe a web can come up with a site where you can enumerate the symptoms, and the site can provide possible diagnoses, you print them out, and present it to your doctor.
    There's always WebMD but if you can see a good neurologist they might be able to help you? Are you still in the Phillipines?

    Imovane works well for sleep, but I'm not sure if it's available in your country? Have you tried sleeping pills before?

    I like what the other poster suggested as well. Excellent advice.
    Roses are red. Tacos are enjoyable. Don't blame immigrants, because you're unemployable.

    T-11 Flaccid Paraplegic due to TM July 1985 @ age 12

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by pian
    I had an accident last 06Sep03 in the Philippines which left me deaf and disabled, plus I suffer from what my first neurologist then termed it as Myoclonus from the brain trauma. My symptoms are:
    I couldn't control my right hand
    I couldn't control the tips of my fingers of my left hand (though I could control it)
    I couldn't control my right toes
    I'm sleep-deprived. => This is my primary concern now. I've read that it's symptom, not age, related. Most likely it has something to do with my accident. My current sleep now only averages 3 hours. I sleep at 8, then I wake up at 11. My target now is to normalize my sleep, for even if my eyes are really sore, I still couldn't fall asleep.
    I feel if I'm prescribed the right muscle-disorder drug, I would regain control of my hands, and get adequate sleep.
    Maybe a web can come up with a site where you can enumerate the symptoms, and the site can provide possible diagnoses, you print them out, and present it to your doctor.
    Sleep disorders are very common in both brain and spinal cord injury. In the case of spinal cord injury, sleep apnea is common. Likewise, it is common in people after even mild head injury (Source). Its mechanisms are not well understood. You may want to read the following chapter by Dr. Johnson on the subject:
    http://www.tbiguide.com/sleepdisorders.html

    Recent research suggest that certain sleeping pills have the opposite effect on people after traumatic brain injury and people with mild brain injuries have delayed sleep phase syndrome:
    http://www.braininjury.com/research.html
    AMBIEN WAKES COMA PATIENTS
    Several instances of partial or significant recovery from coma or vegetative state have been published in the last year, which were caused by the administration of Ambien. The commonly prescribed sleeping pill (Zolpiden) was featured in a BBC documentary aired in October 2007, entitled “The Waking Pill.

    It is thought that Ambien may activate receptions in the brain which are usually reserved for the neuro-transmitter gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA). Researchers believe that brain injury may alter GABA receptors, causing regions of the brain to remain dormant. They speculate that Ambien could possibly temporarily reverse this change.

    Several patients have undergone PET scans to show the increase level of activity in the brain following the administration of Ambien, and such activity was indeed shown.

    MILD BRAIN INJURY AND SLEEP PROBLEMS
    It has long been established that brain injury can cause profound disruptions in sleep which have a significant negative impact on patients. Half the patients in this study were found to have a delayed sleep phase syndrome.”Problems included falling asleep, waking up and irregular sleep patterns.

    This study, along with previous studies, points to sleep difficulties as one of the under appreciated and understudied aspects of traumatic brain injury.

  5. #5
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    I had your symptoms -- the terrible sleep patterns -- for a few years post injury. It turned out to be sleep apnea, even though I weighed ~102 pounds and still do. I can only sleep supine and I think they said that contributed to it. I ended up with a CPAP (continuous positive airway pressure) machine.

    I hope you get an improvement in that situation!

  6. #6
    Does anyone else wake up yet cant move at all. Where your body is still asleep.
    Some times your wide awake, other times its a mix of what your lookn at and dream. Need to struggle to wake. Sometimes cant breath. SCI realated?, not had nearly as often episodes pre SCI.(2x a year) Happends more then once a week post SCI.




    (That damn tri bar hangn direct over head sure brings on fukd up alien abduction dreams. no wonder idiots think theve been anal probed. Honestly, sure seems real as hell. The really far out ones are when I go to move my arm and suddenly dont see it. I feel it move normally, but it hasnt budged. when I look away I can rub, feel , move my legs, arms as if I was normal (cant sit up though) This is not just a normal dream state, its as real if being fully awake. Kinda tells my our brains retain sensation something. Usually nightmarish though.
    Sure is intense.....
    Last edited by patricks; 09-14-2008 at 01:12 AM.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by patricks
    Does anyone else wake up yet cant move at all. Where your body is still asleep.
    Some times your wide awake, other times its a mix of what your lookn at and dream. Need to struggle to wake. Sometimes cant breath. SCI realated?, not had nearly as often episodes pre SCI.(2x a year) Happends more then once a week post SCI.




    (That damn tri bar hangn direct over head sure brings on fukd up alien abduction dreams. no wonder idiots think theve been anal probed. Honestly, sure seems real as hell. The really far out ones are when I go to move my arm and suddenly dont see it. I feel it move normally, but it hasnt budged. when I look away I can rub, feel , move my legs, arms as if I was normal (cant sit up though) This is not just a normal dream state, its as real if being fully awake. Kinda tells my our brains retain sensation something. Usually nightmarish though.
    Sure is intense.....

    When I went through my sleep studies, they asked me questions like you just described but I don't know what it is supposed to be. Hope that helps.
    Every day I wake up is a good one

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