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Thread: How does one get involved in stem cell research?

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by captainwelch
    My undergraduate work was all in music. I need to start over with another undergraduate degree. Would neurobiology be the best choice for undergrad?
    Was your undergraduate work really "all" in music? You took no science courses at all? If you are serious about pursuing a scientific career in stem cell research, you will need to know mathematics, physics, chemistry, biology, organic chemistry, biochemistry, anatomy, physiology, psychology, cell biology, and molecular biology. This will take at least 3 years of undergraduate courses. If you have already taken basic calculus, physics, chemistry, and biology courses already, it should take only two years. You can probably skip a course or two, you will find that your ignorance will hurt you in the long run. On the other hand, you should also know that you have to settle in for a lifetime of crash courses. This is what I find myself doing because science is moving much faster than what the courses can teach.

    Undergraduate students start working in my laboratory in their freshman and sometimes sophomore years. Many of them start doing research alongside their courses. By the time they finish, they are better than most graduate students. Most of them decide to major in cell biology and neuroscience (my department) but some major in biomedical engineering. A few students double-major in science journalism, English, or other subjects. Most graduate to MD, PhD's, or MD-PhD programs. I hope that they remember their excitement in the lab to do serious research and to lead their field.

    Wise.
    Last edited by Wise Young; 09-10-2008 at 09:06 PM.

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Young
    Was your undergraduate work really "all" in music? You took no science courses at all? If you are serious about pursuing a scientific career in stem cell research, you will need to know mathematics, physics, chemistry, biology, organic chemistry, biochemistry, anatomy, physiology, psychology, cell biology, and molecular biology. This will take at least 3 years of undergraduate courses. If you have already taken basic calculus, physics, chemistry, and biology courses already, it should take only two years. You can probably skip a course or two, you will find that your ignorance will hurt you in the long run. On the other hand, you should also know that you have to settle in for a lifetime of crash courses. This is what I find myself doing because science is moving much faster than what the courses can teach.

    Undergraduate students start working in my laboratory in their freshman and sometimes sophomore years. Many of them start doing research alongside their courses. By the time they finish, they are better than most graduate students. Most of them decide to major in cell biology and neuroscience (my department) but some major in biomedical engineering. A few students double-major in science journalism, English, or other subjects. Most graduate to MD, PhD's, or MD-PhD programs. I hope that they remember their excitement in the lab to do serious research and to lead their field.

    Wise.
    Dr,

    Sadly, almost all of my undergrad work was in music with scattered courses in history, art, and composition with no science classes since high school. However, I have done extensive work in mathematics. I'm even a bit of a mathematics freak. I love numbers. I'm not looking at starting classes until the fall, and I've already been trying to catch up so I won't be completely mind boggled when I do start.
    I have all the time in the world. My parents were kind enough to modify their home so I can move back and live for free. I'm close to several great schools. I pick up things very fast, and I'm very motivated... I have alot of things on my side. I just need to do this.
    I am still unsure of which undergraduate program to pursue.... is neurobiology the way to go?

    --mike

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by captainwelch
    Dr,

    Sadly, almost all of my undergrad work was in music with scattered courses in history, art, and composition with no science classes since high school. However, I have done extensive work in mathematics. I'm even a bit of a mathematics freak. I love numbers. I'm not looking at starting classes until the fall, and I've already been trying to catch up so I won't be completely mind boggled when I do start.
    I have all the time in the world. My parents were kind enough to modify their home so I can move back and live for free. I'm close to several great schools. I pick up things very fast, and I'm very motivated... I have alot of things on my side. I just need to do this.
    I am still unsure of which undergraduate program to pursue.... is neurobiology the way to go?

    --mike
    You should contact Dr. John A. Kessler at Northwestern. I recommend him highly. His daughter is spinal-injured.
    http://www.feinberg.northwestern.edu.../kesslerj.html

    Wise.

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Young
    You should contact Dr. John A. Kessler at Northwestern. I recommend him highly. His daughter is spinal-injured.
    http://www.feinberg.northwestern.edu.../kesslerj.html

    Wise.
    regarding Dr. Kessler, you must see this documentary http://www.pbs.org/independentlens/stemcell/

    This documentary follows the life and work of Dr. Kessler. I trust you will find it both inspirational and motivational. You should be able to find this documentary via any good torrent site. good luck
    ______
    Awe at my magnificent coq!

    "You may say I'm a dreamer
    but I'm not" - J. Lennon

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