Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 16

Thread: Rat Embryonic Stem Cells Derived for the First Time

  1. #1

    Rat Embryonic Stem Cells Derived for the First Time

    Establishment of Rat Embryonic Stem Cells and Making of Chimera Rats
    Shinobu Ueda1,2, Masaki Kawamata1, Takumi Teratani1, Taku Shimizu3, Yoshitaka Tamai3, Hiromasa Ogawa4, Katsuyuki Hayashi5, Hiroyuki Tsuda6, Takahiro Ochiya1*


    The rat is a reference animal model for physiological studies and for the analysis of multigenic human diseases such as hypertension, diabetes, neurological disorders, and cancer. The rats have long been used in extensive chemical carcinogenesis studies. Thus, the rat embryonic stem (rES) cell is an important resource for the study of disease models. Attempts to derive ES cells from various mammals, including the rat, have not succeeded. Here we have established two independent rES cells from Wister rat blastocysts that have undifferentiated characters such as Nanog and Oct3/4 genes expression and they have stage-specific embryonic antigen (SSEA) -1, -3, -4, and TRA-1-81 expression. The cells were successfully cultured in an undifferentiated state and can be possible over 18 passages with maintaining more than 40% of normal karyotype. Their pluripotent potential was confirmed by the differentiation into derivatives of the endoderm, mesoderm, and ectoderm. Most importantly, the rES cells are capable of producing chimera rats. Therefore, we established pluripotent rES cell lines that are widely used to produce genetically modified experimental rats for study of human diseases. [...]

    Discussion

    Here, we show for the first time that we have established the rES cells from a Wister rat blastocyst. Our rES cells have all undifferentiated characters as follows: 1) a stable long-term culture can be possible over 18 passages with maintaining more than 40% of normal karyotype; 2) express ES cell-specific genes such as Nanog and Oct3/4; 3) express SSEA-1, -3, -4, and TRA-1-81; 4) maintain the pluripotent potential to differentiate into derivatives of all three embryonic germ layers and are capable of producing chimera rats. Thus, these results define our rES cells as an embryonic stem cell line and will be routinely used to generate targeted mutations, conditional knockout and gene replacement, which are required to produce relevant large animal models for human physiology, disease, regenerative medicine, and pharmaceutical research.

    We established and characterized two independent ES cell lines. Interestingly, the morphology of rES was similar to primate ES cells reported so far and the cells formed flatter colonies than the typical domed colonies of mES cells. Similar to primate ES cells, rES cells exhibited a very low plating efficiency when dissociated into single cells.
    If verified, this would be pretty important.
    ...it's worse than we thought. it turns out the people at the white house are not secret muslims, they're nerds.

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by Steven Edwards
    If verified, this would be pretty important.
    I agree. This has been a long time in coming. Mouse embryonic stem cells were first successfully cultured in the 1970's and revolutionized mouse research by allowing transgenic animals to be made. This can now happen in rats.

    Probably many people are asking why this is so important to spinal cord injury. First and most obviously, it will allow the testing of embryonic stem cell therapies in rats, using rat embryonic stem cells. John McDonald, when he did the first embryonic stem cell study in rats, used mouse embryonic stem cells. Because they were xenografts (transplants from one species to another), he had to use immunosuppression. Second, it will allow the creation of a GFP (green fluorescent protein) rat embryonic stem cell line from Fischer (a isogenic strain of rats that can receive transplants from other individuals) and allow the testing of embryonic stem cells without immunosuppression. Third, it will allow studies of specific genes and their role in spinal cord injury, neuroprotection, and regeneration in rats. To date, we have been limited to doing this in mice.

    Wise.

  3. #3
    Senior Member DA's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    beaumont tx usa
    Posts
    32,389
    this is so exciting, more rat research why humans get the middle finger.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by DA
    this is so exciting, more rat research why humans get the middle finger.
    Rat research is what fills the pipeline of therapies for clinical trials. When that pipeline stops, clinical trials stop. Our problem now is that we have nearly a decade of pipelined drugs and treatments awaiting clinical trial and little or no funding for such trials in the United States. Once those trials start, we need the rat research to keep the pipeline going. When will people understand that the cure is a process, not a single event that is be-all-and-end-all for everybody?

    Wise.

  5. #5
    Senior Member DA's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    beaumont tx usa
    Posts
    32,389
    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Young
    Rat research is what fills the pipeline of therapies for clinical trials. When that pipeline stops, clinical trials stop. Our problem now is that we have nearly a decade of pipelined drugs and treatments awaiting clinical trial and little or no funding for such trials in the United States. Once those trials start, we need the rat research to keep the pipeline going. When will people understand that the cure is a process, not a single event that is be-all-and-end-all for everybody?

    Wise.
    what you mean once those trials start. there is no money for those trials.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Norway
    Posts
    17,427
    Quote Originally Posted by DA
    what you mean once those trials start. there is no money for those trials.
    Ask yourself voting for the rat pack.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Scott Buxton's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Spokane, Washington.
    Posts
    290
    Perhaps thie folllowing question reveals my ignorance - are rats a better model than mice? Scott.

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Digital refugee
    Posts
    1,741
    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Young
    When will people understand that the cure is a process, not a single event that is be-all-and-end-all for everybody?

    Wise.
    I have often wondered how you can incorporate this important point into a successful fund-raising campaign. In today's world where media channels are choked with hype and spin there is little room for the quiet and measured message. People. Seem. To. Have. Short. Attention spans.

    The education campaign, not unlike cure research, needs to be a process more than an event I guess.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Scott Buxton
    Perhaps thie folllowing question reveals my ignorance - are rats a better model than mice? Scott.
    Rats are more genetically similar to humans than are mice, so yes. In fact, they may be the most genetically similar rodent in common use.
    ...it's worse than we thought. it turns out the people at the white house are not secret muslims, they're nerds.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by brocko
    I have often wondered how you can incorporate this important point into a successful fund-raising campaign. In today's world where media channels are choked with hype and spin there is little room for the quiet and measured message. People. Seem. To. Have. Short. Attention spans.

    The education campaign, not unlike cure research, needs to be a process more than an event I guess.
    Brocko,

    I agree that the fact that the cure is a process and not an event should be emphasized more. The problem is partly because we have never gotten beyond the hope message. Fundraising campaigns spend so much of their energy expounding on hope to dispel the nihilism that seems to have paralyzed the doctors and the community, that they seldom have time to go to the next step, i.e. implementation.

    Many other organizations have been there before us. The American Heart Association, the Multiple Sclerosis Society, and other organizations have succeeded in their message of hope and have moved on to implementation. So, they don't argue about whether anything can be done about the heart. Nobody says that AIDS is incurable. They have busy curing. We are still mired in the first stage. Without hope, we have nothing.

    Spinewire and now carecure has been trying to be part of the education campaign for over a decade now. During that time, I estimate that we have been visited by millions of people. At any given time of the day, over 500 people are looking at pages on our web site. So, we are making progress.

    Wise.

    Wise.

Similar Threads

  1. Dr. Young on Cloning & an Opposing View
    By James Kelly in forum Cure
    Replies: 53
    Last Post: 02-14-2014, 08:56 PM
  2. Replies: 29
    Last Post: 07-09-2008, 09:48 PM
  3. Replies: 11
    Last Post: 06-14-2006, 01:50 PM
  4. Norway: The stem cell research potential and politics
    By Leif in forum Funding, Legislation, & Advocacy
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 03-31-2006, 04:42 AM
  5. Replies: 80
    Last Post: 03-22-2006, 05:25 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •