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Thread: 'Super glue' cure helps man recover from paraylsis

  1. #1
    Senior Member Max's Avatar
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    'Super glue' cure helps man recover from paraylsis

    'Super glue' cure helps man recover from paraylsis



    August 13, 2008 12:00am

    DOCTORS used the medical version of "super glue" to give Chris Henkel a "one in a million" recovery from a condition which had left him paralysed from the waist down.
    Mr Henkel, 34, was contemplating life in a wheelchair after he was diagnosed with the extremely rare condition, spinal dural fistula – an abnormal connection of blood vessels causing severe pressure to the spinal cord. Although he had been able to "shuffle" into the Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital emergency department, within days he had lost the use of his legs and was wheeled into surgery on a Sunday with little hope of walking again.
    Radiologist Ken Mitchell, who treated Mr Henkel, said the main aim of the surgery on June 15 was to stop progression of the paralysis to the upper body, which could have killed him.
    "It's a very emotional thing to have a person walk again when they've been paralysed," Dr Mitchell said. "That doesn't happen a lot in medicine."
    Doctors used a $2 million imaging machine to pinpoint the problem, inserted a catheter through an artery in Mr Henkel's groin and injected medical grade super glue to block the abnormality.
    "The recovery is one in a million," said Dr Mitchell, who was called to the hospital to treat Mr Henkel while enjoying a day off at the beach.
    "It's very rare to make a full recovery because the spinal cord is a very sensitive part of our body and any injury to it is basically permanent. I think he's a very lucky man."
    Mr Henkel, of the Redland City suburb of Birkdale, prefers to call it "a miracle".
    He said he had experienced symptoms of the condition, which only affects about 20 people in Australia each year, for about 12 months before it was diagnosed.
    Symptoms ranged from numbness to severe back pain.
    "The last game of touch footy I played, I fell over five times. I thought I was getting unco-ordinated but bigger things were happening," Mr Henkel recalls.
    "I just thought it was a bad back, a pinched nerve."
    Although doctors do not believe Mr Henkel will ever play football again, he is keen to get back on the field for his Redland team, the Lipke Smash.
    "Maybe in two seasons' time, I can get back on the field," he
    http://www.news.com.au/couriermail/s...1-3102,00.html

  2. #2
    Wow, Amazing. You would never see something like that happen in the United States, there would be too many liability issues. They'd rather have the person serve a lifetime in a wheelchair.
    "Life is about how you
    respond to not only the
    challenges you're dealt but
    the challenges you seek...If
    you have no goals, no
    mountains to climb, your
    soul dies".~Liz Fordred

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    Actually they do this many places in the world, including the US and also over here, it’s called embolization, nothing new about this. They also used this technique to “glue off” some fistula feeding arteries inside my spinal cord, -the above was "just" a spinal dural fistula.

    http://brainavm.oci.utoronto.ca/malformations/embo_treat_avm_index.htm

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Leif
    Actually they do this many places in the world, including the US and also over here, it’s called embolization, nothing new about this. They also used this technique to “glue off” some fistula feeding arteries inside my spinal cord, -the above was "just" a spinal dural fistula.

    http://brainavm.oci.utoronto.ca/malformations/embo_treat_avm_index.htm
    Leif, I agree. This embolization approach was pioneered in the 1980's by Alex Berenstein at NYU Medical Center and I was involved in monitoring these cases. Wise.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Young
    Leif, I agree. This embolization approach was pioneered in the 1980's by Alex Berenstein at NYU Medical Center and I was involved in monitoring these cases. Wise.
    Hmmm, interesting, I'd never heard of it. If the glue broke loose though and caused a stroke or something couldnt there be liability issues?
    "Life is about how you
    respond to not only the
    challenges you're dealt but
    the challenges you seek...If
    you have no goals, no
    mountains to climb, your
    soul dies".~Liz Fordred

  6. #6
    yeah it's just that they don't call it super glue here... can you imagine? "you're going to do a WHAT procedure??? Oh embolization, I thought for a minute you said superglue!!"

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    Quote Originally Posted by Curt Leatherbee
    Hmmm, interesting, I'd never heard of it. If the glue broke loose though and caused a stroke or something couldnt there be liability issues?
    Curt. It’s standard procedure at larger hospitals with a neurosurgery department where radiologists perform this procedure. Liability issues? Would you think of that if a not so different heart blood vessel stent procedure were to be performed on you if you needed one? Doubt so.

    Good to hear Wise, I believe you have mentioned your work with Berenstein before, must have been interesting pioneering work.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Curt Leatherbee
    Wow, Amazing. You would never see something like that happen in the United States, there would be too many liability issues. They'd rather have the person serve a lifetime in a wheelchair.
    The procedure may not be new and it obviously is exceptional that it has a result like this. It was not even used as a procedure to promote walking. As it says in the original post:

    Radiologist Ken Mitchell, who treated Mr Henkel, said the main aim of the surgery on June 15 was to stop progression of the paralysis to the upper body, which could have killed him.
    "It's a very emotional thing to have a person walk again when they've been paralysed," Dr Mitchell said. "That doesn't happen a lot in medicine."
    Doctors used a $2 million imaging machine to pinpoint the problem, inserted a catheter through an artery in Mr Henkel's groin and injected medical grade super glue to block the abnormality.
    "The recovery is one in a million,"
    This is an unexpected and very probably unpredictable result of the procedure and does on not in any way represent a reliable cure .

  9. #9
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    Its not a CURE. It’s just standard procedures dealing with some bloodvessels not wanted as when some bloddvessels starts living their own life and make spagetty. Approximatly 10 percent of brain attacs starts with something like this. No biggies, and the same procedure “glue agents of different kind” have been used over many years. It’s standard radiolocalal procedure, enough of that, but even serious Fox News had a story on it, I thougt they did througoutly journalism before reporting any "glue" stories; http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,402201,00.html

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    Adrian, a spinal dural fistula often can be knocked out easily, if neurological deflects are discovered before it does too much harm, like this article shows. The dura, a supporting hose for the cord with blood vessels in the layers surrounding the cord and blood vessels going into the cord is not so much a big deal anymore, -even in the “old” days the neurosurgeons just opened up the back and did a laminectomy and just cut away the SDF, put on a clip on the blood vessels not wanted and that was it, and many had no problems thereafter.

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