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Thread: Are there Any Aides/Personal Assistants Out There!!!

  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    3

    Are there Any Aides/Personal Assistants Out There!!!

    I just wanted toknow if there is any one out there who is either an aide or personal assistant. I know I can't be the only one on this site who is as interested in their job like I am.

  2. #2
    Hi, caregiver,

    I'll try to get my son's PCA to join and chat with you. I think there was someone else - Wen - who posted on the Care forum a while ago; look here:

    http://carecure.org/forum/showthread.php?t=4169

    Why don't you tell us a bit about yourself - are you caring for someone with SCI (no personal details, please, unless you have his/her permission)? Are you a private aide, or do you work for any agency?

    Lots of people have posted re their difficulties in finding good aides; there seems to be a terrible shortage of truly qualified people. Could you share with us your side of the story? I know working through an agency doesn't pay very well, and working as a private doesn't really provide benefits; are those some of the major problems on your side?

    Thanks for joining, and feel free to ask questions of anyone here!

    _____________
    Tough times don't last - tough people do.

  3. #3
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    3
    Hi thanks for the information. Well there is not much to tell about myself. I am 37 years old. I rather not give too much information I am sure you can understand. When you are a personal assistant you learn that there are many things that must remain private. You never know who knows who! Yes I am the personal assistant of a sci. I love my job, it is my career. Although, that is hard to say at times knowing there aren't any benefits nor a sense of security of knowing how long I will be able to work. I guess it is the learning experience that keeps me going. I am sure you know it is always something new to learn. I work privately, screw those agencies. All they care about are themselves. Everyone has feelings including the aides. you know agencies don't pay much, but the total compensation equals to well over working privately. If you work thru a good agency you have benefits(vacation,holidays,sick days,retirement, and health benefits). Although there is alot of sh** that comes along with the package. Private duty is very demanding and being personal assistant is alot more work and stress than being an aide. Not everyone can be an aide or a personal assistant. You have to have a heart and know that money isn't everything.

  4. #4
    "Not everyone can be an aide or a personal assistant. You have to have a heart and know that money isn't everything."

    Amen to that, caregiver! Being a paid caregiver is being dedicated to your client, as well as to the family; knowing when to step in and knowing when to butt out; reading the 'mood' of the day, as well as taking care of all the other minutiae of details that go along. My hats are off to all the dedicated professional assistants/caregivers out there, and the great job they do.

    _____________
    Tough times don't last - tough people do.

  5. #5
    alantown
    Guest

    question =)

    what are some qualifications (training/ education/ physical requirements etc.) in being an aide and or personal assistant? if anyone could answer that for me I'd appreciate that

  6. #6
    Senior Member KLD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    California
    Posts
    866

    PCA qualifications

    At the hospital where I work, we run a PCA training program (40 hours). While many people do fine hiring people with no previous work experience, it has been to our advantage as a SCI center to have some people with basic knowledge and skills available to our clients. Regardless, prior to coming into the program, we do not expect these PCAs to have any previous healthcare experience, although a few have been HHAs or CNAs, and we have also had a few foreign trained (but not USA licensed) RNs. I am not sure that these folks were any better in the course than those without experience though.

    We recruit to the program primarily for those who have a history of reliability, some maturity (second career is good), have transporation that is reliable, are interested in the work, are NOT do-gooders or religious zealots out to convert the world, and who appear to understand their role as employee, not nurse or director of the disabled person's care/life. We also are interested in people who want irregular hours and who leave near areas of our community where it is difficult to recruit PCAs. Physical strength is good, but not required as we often send people home with mechanical lifts, and it certainly is not a requirement for our nursing staff. Good physical health is important though (we do get TB tests and a short physical as part of the job requirement, and have had to refuse enrollment to those with uncontrolled hypertension or serious previous back injuries). We do not require a CPR card, but do recommend they get one as some employers do want one.

    We have found retired military (both men and women) are often good PCAs. They retire at an early age, have a steady retirement income and benefits, and are often looking for some supplemental income. In addition, they come from a background of having responsibility and being used to meeting deadlines and a schedule. Some of our best long-term PCAs were mechanics or supply clerks in the military, with no medical assignments or training. We now actively recruit through the military base newspapers and on bulletin boards at the local PXs.

    Here are some good resources for those who are either considering this work, or who are considering hiring a PCA, or who want to learn ways to do this better (if you have had some bad experiences):

    http://www.wa-ilsc.org/toc2ack.html

    http://whitesellenterprises.com/pricezrite/

  7. #7
    hats off the you, caregiver - you must be in minority

    my friend who had a complete C5 who died last year, eventually used his father, brothers and close family friends as no reliable caregiver was EVER found in his 19 yeat struggle

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