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Thread: Partner relationships of couples with SCI or TBI

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  1. #1

    Partner relationships of couples with SCI or TBI

    This is an interesting article from Sweden, comparing partner relationships. Close to 60% of people with SCI or TBI had a stable partner relationship. Furthermore, most of these were established after injury. Not unexpectedly, people with SCI and TBI both had greater incidence of depression than non-injured controls. People with SCI felt that their quality of life was lower than controls while people with TBI did not differ from controls.

    • Kreuter M, Sullivan M, Dahllof AG and Siosteen A (1998). Partner relationships, functioning, mood and global quality of life in persons with spinal cord injury and traumatic brain injury. Spinal Cord. 36 (4): 252-61. Summary: The aim of this study was to assess and compare spinal cord injured (SCI) and traumatic brain injured (TBI) persons and people from the general population concerning partner relationships, functioning, mood and global quality of life. One hundred and sixty seven SCI persons, 92 TBI persons and 264 controls participated in the study. The median age was: SCI persons 33 years (range 19 to 79 years), TBI persons 40 years (range 20 to 70 years), and controls 31 years (range 19 to 79 years). Age at injury ranged among SCI persons from 14 to 76 years (Md 28 years), and among TBI persons from 16 to 56 years (Md 32 years). Half of the SCI group (51%), 58% of the TBI group and 59% of the controls had a stable partner relationship at the time of the investigation. Many of these SCI and TBI relationships (38% and 55% respectively) were established after injury. Both SCI and TBI persons showed significantly more depressive feelings compared with the controls. Perceived quality of life (global QL rating) was significantly lower in the SCI group compared with the controls, whereas the ratings of TBI persons and controls did not differ significantly. SCI and TBI persons did not differ significantly in level of education, perceived quality of life or distress. In all three groups, global quality-of-life ratings were significantly lower among single persons compared to those with a partner relationship. It was concluded that both SCI and TBI appear to affect overall quality of life and mental well-being negatively. The number of partner relationships contracted after injury among both SCI and TBI persons indicates, however, that the injury is not a major barrier to establishing close partner relationships. Being in good spirits, that is, lack of depressive feelings has a profound impact on the perception of a high quality of life in all three groups. For the SCI and TBI persons, a high level of physical and social independence were further positive determinants of a perceived high quality of life. <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&li st_uids=9589525> Spinal Injuries Unit, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.

  2. #2
    I found this article to be very interesting. Relationships can be a very important attribute to the quality life. Being able to please someone else and feel wanted yourself helps to elevate the way you proceive yourself. Humans, like all animals crave acceptance and need to be paid attention to. It is very disturbing that people in the world now a days care more for themselves then others. Don't they realize it make you feel better to make someone else feel good. It is nice to read that there is a larger percentage of SCI and TBI people that make relationships work. I think that may be because SCI and TBI people understand the human phsyci a little better and value life to a greater degree.

  3. #3
    Senior Member zillazangel's Avatar
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    That is great - now I can quote that 38% of married SCInjured persons marry post injury. I get so many jaw drops when I tell person XYZ that Chad and I met and married 15 years after his injury. I'm not alone!
    Wife of Chad (C4/5 since 1988), mom of a great teenager

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by zillazangel
    That is great - now I can quote that 38% of married SCInjured persons marry post injury. I get so many jaw drops when I tell person XYZ that Chad and I met and married 15 years after his injury. I'm not alone!
    We cannot marry or I'd lose my health care and my partner would lose his primary job, but as long as our wills are respected I should be fine.

    I'm surprised you encounter so much surprise. Amongst those I know a disability is more of a characteristic than some old-fashioned curse. Then again, I tend to hang around progressive people.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Blackmare View Post
    We cannot marry or I'd lose my health care and my partner would lose his primary job, but as long as our wills are respected I should be fine.

    I'm surprised you encounter so much surprise. Amongst those I know a disability is more of a characteristic than some old-fashioned curse. Then again, I tend to hang around progressive people.
    I am glad I am not alone! I met the LOVE of my life, but we cannot marry also because He would lose his health care also

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by zillazangel
    now I can quote that 38% of married SCInjured persons marry post injury. I get so many jaw drops when I tell person XYZ that Chad and I met and married 15 years after his injury.
    Hey, I've gotten married twice since my accident and was proposed to by a third guy.

    C.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by zillazangel
    That is great - now I can quote that 38% of married SCInjured persons marry post injury. I get so many jaw drops when I tell person XYZ that Chad and I met and married 15 years after his injury. I'm not alone!
    hubby and i get that too. it's irritating.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by zillazangel
    That is great - now I can quote that 38% of married SCInjured persons marry post injury. I get so many jaw drops when I tell person XYZ that Chad and I met and married 15 years after his injury. I'm not alone!
    What I hate is the "Oh you're such a wonderful man for sticking with her through this all" load of crap...

    like. WTF? I just want to say
    "Excuse me? You think I'm such a burdeon because I broke my back that you think my husband should leave me?

    Go away now and fall off the world."

    but usually I'm too shocked to think of that comeback.

  9. #9
    I guess I'm in the minority with my relationship with tigger74, with me having a brain ingury and him having a SCI. Everything is great though, I love him with all my heart and would do anything for him and he the same for me . We understand each other so well, we have the similar fears when it comes to relationships, being that we both have had our bought with individuals who have taken advantage of us. All of these statistics are on people with either SCI or TBI, so I think a relationship where both of the partners have one or the other might be considered to be more difficult, but I just don't see it. All it takes is both partners to respect one another, love each other, and be there no matter what the adversity may be. I met tigger on October 8th 2006 and it was definatly love at first sight , he swept me off my feet with his mannerisms and great personality. He has also kept me loving him by just being himself!

  10. #10

    Smile

    I love you sweetie! Thank you for being here for me. See you soon!

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