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Thread: "ANTS" We could take lessons

  1. #1

    "ANTS" We could take lessons


  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by garlin
    I'm thinking this video might have been posted to "Science, etc...." along with mine on the Cordyceps_Fungus - and I'm thinking how inhumane the approach of these "scientists" in using all that concrete to establish the size and shape of the ant colony (10 tonnes) while destroying it and its inhabitants. I guess there's a clue in the narrator's use of the term, "aliens" while describing the ants. Surely sonar and/or other imaging techniques could have established the physical reality of the colony w/o destroying it and a respectful approach like that is more in keeping with the humane investigation of the natural world and its organisms.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Juke_spin
    I'm thinking this video might have been posted to "Science, etc...." along with mine on the Cordyceps_Fungus - and I'm thinking how inhumane the approach of these "scientists" in using all that concrete to establish the size and shape of the ant colony (10 tonnes) while destroying it and its inhabitants. I guess there's a clue in the narrator's use of the term, "aliens" while describing the ants. Surely sonar and/or other imaging techniques could have established the physical reality of the colony w/o destroying it and a respectful approach like that is more in keeping with the humane investigation of the natural world and its organisms.
    Seriously Juke? How do you feel about animals being used for SCI research?

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by mimin
    Seriously Juke? How do you feel about animals being used for SCI research?
    I'm pretty OK with it although it seems kinda overdone w/o the application of clinical trials on our kind. I'm not OK with how these so called scientists went about creating a model of the ant colony they were studying by pouring tons of cement into it when noninvasive/destructive imaging models could have been created w/o all that.

    I'd have been perfectly happy with a computer generated model based on sonar. Besides, who needed such a life-sized model based on destroying the nest and all its inhabitants?

    You're OK with it?

    How do you feel about being part of the global experiment in manipulating thought and perception being conducted for decades now by corporate entities? Oops, first you'd have to be aware that it's happening, wouldn't you?
    Last edited by Juke_spin; 07-30-2008 at 06:42 PM.

  5. #5
    I'm not not ok with it... ok, I guess I'm ok with it - killing the ants for science. I have no problem killing ants around my house.

    And yes, I enjoy having my opinions fed to me, it's too hard to form my own.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by mimin
    I'm not not ok with it... ok, I guess I'm ok with it - killing the ants for science. I have no problem killing ants around my house.

    And yes, I enjoy having my opinions fed to me, it's too hard to form my own.
    Scientifically, the fission bombing of Hiroshima offered the chance to study the wholesale, large-scale effects of radiation on human physiology and mutation potential. So from you callous take on ant annihilation for scientific study I guess that was fine with you as well. Or is it only disregard for insect life in the scope of scientific study that's sanguine where you're concerned.

    From your second answer I'd say your kind were well selected and targeted; the ideal subjects.
    "The world will not perish for want of wonders but for want of wonder."
    J.B.S.Haldane

  7. #7
    I hope The Science Channel re-airs that soon. I read that it was filmed in hi-def... cool.

    I don't like killing anything but I'm okay with what the scientists did. More than likely it's the only time that it will ever be done (costs a lot) so they had to sacrifice a "few million" ants. More than likely half or more of the colony was out foraging and will start a new one not too far away. The owner of the land is probably happy to be rid of the colony... one of his/her cattle could break a leg in one of those vents.

    I don't think ground penetrating radar is perfected to the point where it can give the level of detail necessary to get the job done. It would be nice if they move the cast to some museum so more people can see it. I guess they'd have to cut it into manageable size pieces and then re-assemble it.

    What I don't like is how the cosmetics industry goes about abusing animals to make sure their products are safe for humans. Vanity products like mascara and eye-liner, etc. Each company does its own research because they don't want their competitors to know what new chemicals they're using in their products. So the same experiments are needlessly done over and over. Even when they know that a competitor has already done the experiments, they can't or won't, use the results. They don't want to tip their hand in any way. So as a result thousands or hundreds of thousands (??) of rabbits and other lab animals are blinded, killed and made to suffer every year doing the same research. I imagine the same is true in every competive business. Even... or perhaps especially, in the field of medicine.

    It's possible that the colony was already abondoned but I don't see how. A couple people wrote that it was... I assumed they may have seen the whole documentary??

    I think this was brutal:

    Lol but Disney was cruel. Back in the day when they made documentaries (40's - 50's) they actually murdered an entire heard of lemmings. You see, everyone knows that lemmings sometimes, depending on the season, get up and run off cliffs into the water, right? Wrong. At the time Disney created this documentary it really was believed that lemmings did this every so often even though they don't. When the Disney film crew got there to shoot the lemming suicide scene, however, they were surprised to see that the lemmings weren't acting suicidal at all, contrary to their own incorrect beliefs which they assumed were correct. After much time and frustration, because they mistakenly believed it was going to happen anyway, some of the members of the camera crew were used to drive the lemmings over a cliff while it was filmed. Scenes of drowning lemmings were captured while others were still falling from the cliff, only many of the lemmings which can still be seen to be falling in this scene are actually being thrown off the cliff by hand .
    Would Mickey, Minnie and Goofie REALLY do such a thing!?


    I love the last part of this response:

    There is an artist/scientist who makes bronze casts of ant colony caverns. They are very beautiful, that scientist certainly does do the casts on abandoned colonies. This one was also vacant. The commentator claims this is the equivalent of the great wall of china - maybe that is true on a labor vs. laborer vs. overall project size, however, the great wall of china has bricks and mortar and probably most importantly, intentional design and artistry. While a colony cast is beautiful, it was made the way it was simply because that was the most simple method/design to meet their needs.

    I don't think its cool to put people or ants under a magnifying glass at noon, but there is a difference in the level of evil it takes to fry one over the other.
    Made me think!

    Bob.
    "Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a great battle." - Philo of Alexandria

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Juke_spin
    Scientifically, the fission bombing of Hiroshima offered the chance to study the wholesale, large-scale effects of radiation on human physiology and mutation potential. So from you callous take on ant annihilation for scientific study I guess that was fine with you as well. Or is it only disregard for insect life in the scope of scientific study that's sanguine where you're concerned.
    Do I kill pesky people who hang around my house? No. There's a difference.

    From your second answer I'd say your kind were well selected and targeted; the ideal subjects.
    Selected and targeted.... lol. Now you're making me feel like an animal in the wild that scientists want to study. I guess that was your point, then?

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