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Thread: Depression....what can you do?

  1. #31
    Senior Member BJ's Avatar
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    Depression what can you do

    In regards to the question of complete quads working. Yes it is possible, hubby has a c5-6 injury has either gone to school full time or worked 7-5 6 days a week for the last 20 years. I worked 7:30-4:30 during this time as well so it was a zoo getting both of us out of the house and on the road by 6:30 every day.

    As far as aides at work - he takes himself to work and takes his lunch, had never had help during the day with personal stuff. He's a engineer and does all his work on a mainframe and desk top computer.

    Even during college he lived in the dorm and only had an aide for 2 hrs a day.

    Retirement is really looking good....... only 5 more years

  2. #32
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    Pretty neat,

    to hear about everyone of you guys pressing forward with your lives.Working 20 years with C5 C6 is almost hard to believe. Thats so awesome. And no help at work. I don't get it. Justin can eat most stuff on his own but needs some kind of set up to get started. Does your husband have some hands and triceps? That makes all the difference in the world. Even the ability to sqeeze 2 fingers together would be great.

  3. #33
    Senior Member Clipper's Avatar
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    Quads DO work

    I am a C5/6 quad with no finger movement or triceps. I went to college full-time beginning one year after my accident. I currently work full-time and have been for the past seven years since graduation. I have no aides who assist me at work. I drive, but mainly use the subway. I mostly work out of my home, but I also go into my firm's office three times a week. I am three hours shy of my master's degree. Over the years, I have come across many things that work for me and make it possible to have a full-time job and be very independent. I use as little "adaptive equipment" as possible. Identify your passion, make it happen. It can be done.

  4. #34

    Echo

    Yes, as Clipper stated. Quads do work. I'm C6-7, no fingers but I'm still plugging away at a Wall Street career, which by the way is ideal for sci. My job is not about the money but more the mental exercise.

    Generally, It's a question of motivation. In my opinion every sci injured person should work, attempt to work or volunteer. Everyone can contribute. We all have a verse in this concert we call life.

    With a brain and a voice amazing things can be accomplished. You just have to find the right path.

  5. #35
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    Work

    Originally posted by Clipper:

    I am a C5/6 quad with no finger movement or triceps. I went to college full-time beginning one year after my accident. I currently work full-time and have been for the past seven years since graduation. I have no aides who assist me at work. I drive, but mainly use the subway. I mostly work out of my home, but I also go into my firm's office three times a week. I am three hours shy of my master's degree. Over the years, I have come across many things that work for me and make it possible to have a full-time job and be very independent. I use as little "adaptive equipment" as possible. Identify your passion, make it happen. It can be done.
    I am also a C5-C6 complete injury quad. I am just wondering how much you can do without help. With no finger movement and no tricept, can you dress yourself up, comb your hair or bathe yourself? If not how do you manage to get ready to go to work every morning? How about catherization, can you do it yourself? I would appreciate any information on how to be as much independent as possible. Thanks, Hyacinth.

  6. #36
    Senior Member Clipper's Avatar
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    My roommate helps me with my morning activities, such as dressing and bathing. I have someone help me into bed at night. I have had morning aides in the past, but this arrangement works best for me right now. I can do a lot of the shower myself, as well as other grooming activities such as combing my hair and brushing my teeth.

    I have an indwelling catheter attached to a leg bag and an electronic draining device. This allows me to drink plenty of fluids and not rely on someone to empty the bag.

    Once in my chair, I am very independent. This has taken years of discovering what works best, like placing things I need where I can reach them, etc.

    I'm a big believer in NOT spending time on things that require moderate assistance. For example, I'd rather just get up rather than have someone hand me my pants so I can wrestle with them for an hour. Waste of time.

    Please let me know if you have more questions.

  7. #37
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    Rename this thread,

    High Quads working, Wow guys, this is very helpful but I think for us who are not there yet its hard to imagine without some real detailing of your days.From getting up in the morning, getting out, driving, eating,getting back in the house so on. Some of the things you dream builders have down to be more independent could help a bunch of folks who may be newer and more fearful.Good Stuff, thanks and I apolagise for getting off the original topic.It does help in a round about way. If we can get the loved ones we're caring for more independent we wouldn't be as bumbed.

  8. #38
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    Originally posted by Clipper:

    My roommate helps me with my morning activities, such as dressing and bathing. I have someone help me into bed at night. I have had morning aides in the past, but this arrangement works best for me right now. I can do a lot of the shower myself, as well as other grooming activities such as combing my hair and brushing my teeth.

    I have an indwelling catheter attached to a leg bag and an electronic draining device . This allows me to drink plenty of fluids and not rely on someone to empty the bag.

    Once in my chair, I am very independent. This has taken years of discovering what works best, like placing things I need where I can reach them, etc.

    I'm a big believer in NOT spending time on things that require moderate assistance. For example, I'd rather just get up rather than have someone hand me my pants so I can wrestle with them for an hour. Waste of time.

    Please let me know if you have more questions.
    Thank you so much for the information, it's very impressive. I am familiar with an indwelling catheter attached to a leg bag but I don't know how an electronic draining device works. It sounds like a good option, so please let me know the details about it. Thanks.

  9. #39
    Clipper, I would also like to find out more about the electronic draining device? Where did you get it from? That would be a big help for me. My e-mail is wcarlr@concentric.net. Thanks

  10. #40
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    Depression

    Originally posted by AliceM:

    It is devastating to see the one you love the most suffer constantly. My son's injury is almost two years old. He has always refused anti-depressants. I have tried to cheer him up which seems to have little effect. What can I do? Do I ignore him, try to get him using his wonderful mind thinking about sports, etc.? I am at a loss. He got a chocolate lab puppy 4 months ago and she has helped temper his dark moods. The weekends and holidays are his worst times. He talks constantly of the mountain bike trails, back packing adventures, etc. always in terms of I will never get to experience again. If I say once we get your pain in control, you can go biking, hiking etc. he becomes very mad. He says, "it is not the same Mom". His dark moods spread to me and it is so hard to fight it and remain positive which is my nature. I am looking forward to reading your adivse. Thank you.
    I am sorry about the hardship your son is having. I am also 2 years post the injury and I know what he is going through. I don't take any anti-depressant either but I do not feel depressed because I have faith in God and he carries me through any trial. I have decided to appreciate the least I have rather than complain about what I don't have. In case you don't share my view, please do not feel offended. Thanks.

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