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Thread: acupunture

  1. #1
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    acupunture

    Has anyone ever tried acupuncter to help with muscle spasms, neuro pain etc? I am considering it. Has anyone heard anything out acupuncture being beneficial for SCI?

  2. #2
    Yes, acupuncture has been used with some success for both spasticity and neuropathic pain management. Unfortunately many insurances do not cover this, and treatment is often needed as often as 3X weekly for several months for it to be effective. There have been some cases reported of acupuncture causing AD in those at risk so it should be used cautiously in this situation.

    (KLD)

  3. #3
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    That is good to know... until my last uti a couple weeks ago I rarley had AD. Now I get it all the time, even whentaking off my pants. It seems like it is "awake" now.

  4. #4
    Senior Member StevieP's Avatar
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    I have heard that it does work for some, unfortunately it did not work for me. Just make sure that you find somone who will stop when it is not working and not milk you for all the lunch money you have.

    Stevie P

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  6. #6
    Senior Member alan's Avatar
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    I tried with a few acupuncturists, but no help. Everyone is different, so it might help you. Good luck.
    Alan

    Proofread carefully to see if you any words out.

  7. #7
    Super Moderator Sue Pendleton's Avatar
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    Worked great on my post SCI sciatica. Had about 6 treatments done by my physiatrist at Walter Reed. He was careful about watching for spasms kicking off during the first treatment. I'd look for an MD or NP to do it who has a lot of training.
    Courage doesn't always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, "I will try again tomorrow."

    Disclaimer: Answers, suggestions, and/or comments do not constitute medical advice expressed or implied and are based solely on my experiences as a SCI patient. Please consult your attending physician for medical advise and treatment. In the event of a medical emergency please call 911.

  8. #8
    Acupuncture can be a very effective treatment for pain after spinal chord injuries. However, it does not work for everyone. Research shows that acupuncture is effective in about 50% of cases. Here is the reference:

    Is acupuncture effective in treating chronic pain after spinal cord injury?
    Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2001 Nov;82(11):1578-86.
    Nayak S, Shiflett SC, Schoenberger NE, Agostinelli S, Kirshblum S, Averill A, Cotter AC.


    Dept of Psychiatry, New Jersey Medical School, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Newark 07107, USA. nayaksa@umdnj.edu

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the efficacy of acupuncture as a treatment for chronic pain and secondary symptoms after spinal cord injury (SCI) and to identify disease-specific variables associated with response to treatment. DESIGN: A within-subjects design consisting of a 7(1/2)-week no-acupuncture baseline period followed by a 7(1/2)-week treatment period and a follow-up assessment 3 months posttreatment. SETTING: Medical rehabilitation research center. PARTICIPANTS: Twenty-two people with SCI who experienced moderate to severe pain of at least 6 months' duration. INTERVENTION: A course of 15 acupuncture treatments was administered over a 7(1/2)-week period. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Numeric Rating Scale of pain intensity; ratings of interference with activity, individualized symptom rating, Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale; Speilberger State Trait Anxiety Inventory, and General Well-Being Schedule. RESULTS: Ten patients (46%) showed improvement in pain intensity and pain sequelae after treatment. However, 6 patients (27%) reported an increase in pain that was still present 3 months after treatment. CONCLUSIONS: About 50% of the study sample reported substantial pain relief after acupuncture treatment, suggesting that acupuncture may provide pain relief for at least a subgroup of individuals with SCI. Future research is needed to determine what part of this effect is because of acupuncture versus nonspecific effects such as placebo effects and regression to the mean. Copyright 2001 by the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine and the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
    Last edited by SCI-Nurse; 07-04-2008 at 02:26 AM.

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