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Thread: Question for Dr Wise "Schwann Cell" ?

  1. #1

    Question for Dr Wise "Schwann Cell" ?

    Hi dr Wise
    Where we can find the Schwann cells in human body ? where is the source of schwann cells. ? what is the best way to culture schwann cells?>.

    please inform us by details.
    Thanks

    Mahmoud

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by justbecrusin
    Hi dr Wise
    Where we can find the Schwann cells in human body ? where is the source of schwann cells. ? what is the best way to culture schwann cells?>.

    please inform us by details.
    Thanks

    Mahmoud
    Schwann cells can be obtained from your own peripheral nerves. A doctor i China, for example, tied off a peripheral nerve (sural) in the legs on patients. waited a week so that it would grow out Schwann cells, and then transplanted that part of the nerve into the spinal cord. He says that patients recovered some function, including better bladder. He is following the patients. It has been over 2 years.

    I know that the Miami Project is setting up a GMP (Good Manufacturing Practice) facility to grow Schwann cells from peripheral nerves, and then ship the cells to surgeons who want to transplant them. They want to do a clinical trial.

    Wise.

  3. #3
    Regenerative Activity In The Peripheral Nervous System Could Mean Regeneration For The Central Nervous System

    ScienceDaily (May 22, 2008) — Researchers at the Peninsula Medical School in the South West of England, University College London, the San Raffaele Scientific Institute in Milan and Cancer Research UK, have for the first time identified a protein that is key to the regeneration of damage in the peripheral nervous system and which could with further research lead to understanding diseases of our peripheral nervous systems and provide clues to methods of repairing damage in the central nervous system, according to a paper recently published in the Journal of Cell Biology.


    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...0519092202.htm

    How feasible is "identifying ways in which Schwann cells and c-Jun could be used to repair the spinal cord."

    f
    ight

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by donz
    Regenerative Activity In The Peripheral Nervous System Could Mean Regeneration For The Central Nervous System

    ScienceDaily (May 22, 2008) — Researchers at the Peninsula Medical School in the South West of England, University College London, the San Raffaele Scientific Institute in Milan and Cancer Research UK, have for the first time identified a protein that is key to the regeneration of damage in the peripheral nervous system and which could with further research lead to understanding diseases of our peripheral nervous systems and provide clues to methods of repairing damage in the central nervous system, according to a paper recently published in the Journal of Cell Biology.


    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...0519092202.htm

    How feasible is "identifying ways in which Schwann cells and c-Jun could be used to repair the spinal cord."
    Donz,

    Sorry... the answer to your question is that Schwann cells have been extensively studied in spinal cord injury. At least half a dozen groups have looked at transplantation of Schwann cells into the spinal cord. It has been done in humans. The Miami Project has been doing this for nearly two decades. While Schwann cells alone seem to be slightly beneficial, they appear to be more so when combined with other therapies.

    Regarding c-jun, this is an "early" response to injury that is expressed by many cells in all types of tissues. It is elevated in spinal cord injury and is strongly expressed by inflammatory cells. It alone does not seem to be enough to get regeneration going although it may well play a role. It is a precursor to inflammatory activation of cells and may well be signal pro-inflammatory cytokines and neurotrophin production.

    By the way, Schwann cells that have differentiated to myelinate axons probably do not produce other Schwann cells. If there were so, then transplantation of myelinated peripheral should have all sorts of beneficial effects on the spinal cord, since myelinated axons are chock full of Schwann cells. However, if you try to grow Schwann cells out of myelianted nerves, you will have a hard time getting any of the cells to grow.

    It turns out that the best thing to do is the injure the peripheral nerve by tying it off a week before. When this happens and the axons die, the Schwann cells transform themselves to become macrophages that clean up the debris and they can form more Schwann cells. If pre-injured nerves are cultured, one can grow many Schwann cell precursor cells that when transplanted into the spinal cord can produce more Schwann cells.

    I know of a surgeon in China who has done this with animals and in patients. In animals, he tied off the sural nerve and injured the spinal cord. A week later, he harvested the nerve, minced it up, and transplanted it into the spinal cord. He reports that this improves the function in the rats. He reported in 2005 that he has done this with 10 patients. He tied off their nerve, harvested it a week later, and then transplanted to their spional cord.
    These are in chronic patients, I believes. He reports some beneficial effects.

    Wise.
    Last edited by Wise Young; 05-26-2008 at 11:37 PM.

  5. #5
    thanks you dr wise for informing such a details

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