Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 20

Thread: Sure Hands

  1. #1

    Sure Hands

    ’ve been saving for a Sure Hands lift for years wanting to be as independent as possible. So I bought one. It was installed Thursday by some fine gentlemen. I learned my contractor, when I had work done, f*cked up my roof but that’s another tale.

    If you’re a c6 complete and can use this technology please help. I can manage to get my legs in the horrific metal clamp like looking things and place the squeezer under my armpits and raise the lift then I start to slide out. I have some bruising as if a road rash beneath my armpits.

    When I am in it and the lift is moving from chair to bed and I’m attempting to operate the buttons the air leaves my lungs and it feels as if I am about to pass out.

    I’ll need to re-watch the video of the happy quad woman who looked so INDEPENDENT at her C6 Level. I know as with most things it’ll take time trying to figure out what is best for me. Just looking for solutions if anyone has any.

    I recall a fellow CC’er from FL who posted pics of himself moving from place to place and he looked quite comfy!. I will of course call the company Monday to see what they suggest, but users of equipment are much better than salespersons when it comes to DME stuff, IMHO.
    Get involved in politics as if your life depended on it, because it does. -- Justin Dart

    I shall not tolerate ignorance or hate speech on this site.

  2. #2
    I don't know anything about this particular piece of equip but I urge you not to get disappointed and abandon the technology. This forum should be a good source for help but if not try the New Mobility or Wheelchairjunkie or other forums with your questions. Question the DME vendor and the manufacturer until they shiver at the sound of your name.

    As they said on X Files, "The answer is out there!"

  3. #3
    You should not have taken delivery or paid without the vendor training you how to use it and being sure you can use it independently and safely. A critical adjustment is the length of the leg straps. Insist that the vendor come back to your house and do the required training and problem solving with you.

    (KLD)

  4. #4
    Hi, Liz, we have one and I use it for Matt all the time. As KLD said, the length and position of the leg straps is important; also where you're placing them on your thighs - they should be about mid-thigh. If you're putting them closer to your knees, that could be a reason you're slipping. Also, make sure the underarm supports are -all- the way under your armpits.

    I also agree with KLD that you need to call the vendor (and hopefully they're not just salespeople, but actually know how the lift works and have been trained) to come out for more instruction.

    As for the feelings, Matt felt similar things; weird feeling in his lungs, and his arms were sore the first week or so. I think it's a matter of just getting used to it. It really is a great device!
    _____________

  5. #5
    How do you independantly work it once you're dangling in the air? Is there some sort of track remote?

    ETA: Just found the demo video for it on their site. They focused more on the lifting and only showed it moving the girl over a few feet, therefore it must be track driven..
    Last edited by 2jazzyjeff; 05-18-2008 at 11:11 AM.





    Life isn't like a bowl of cherries or peaches. It's more like a jar of jalapenos--What you do today might burn your ass tomorrow.

    If you ain't laughing, you ain't living, baby. Carlos Mencia

  6. #6
    Yes, you hold a control in your hand; it's attached to the hoist, so moves along the track with you; it's on a motorized trolley.
    We were very hopeful about the SureHands lift and tried it out at the dealer's a couple of times, with different sized leg holders. But it was too painful for my wife to use. It does look like it would be great for some, as it could be much easier to use than a conventional sling.
    - Richard

  7. #7
    Another possible difficulty I see is that on the video, her armrests flip back completely out of the way. My armrests don't and could potentially be in the way. Anyone use one where they successfully get around bulky armrests? I'm sure like anything else, it's a learned procedure over time..

    Any ballpark prices? Say for a 10' stick from the bed to chair?

    http://208.56.109.158/video/index.htm





    Life isn't like a bowl of cherries or peaches. It's more like a jar of jalapenos--What you do today might burn your ass tomorrow.

    If you ain't laughing, you ain't living, baby. Carlos Mencia

  8. #8
    Although it's been a while & I haven't looked through my stuff, I think it would have been roughly $5K or so. Maybe somewhat more.

  9. #9
    Ok, thanks Richard.





    Life isn't like a bowl of cherries or peaches. It's more like a jar of jalapenos--What you do today might burn your ass tomorrow.

    If you ain't laughing, you ain't living, baby. Carlos Mencia

  10. #10
    Oh, the installer will come. I'm pleased with the service just wanted info from others. 10K is not a small price.

    I watched the video of the woman w/ my level using it quite well. I need to practice.


    Thanks all!!
    Get involved in politics as if your life depended on it, because it does. -- Justin Dart

    I shall not tolerate ignorance or hate speech on this site.

Similar Threads

  1. Tight, shiny skin on hands
    By skippy13 in forum Care
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 04-20-2008, 09:12 PM
  2. Hands
    By Leo in forum Life
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 07-10-2005, 02:45 PM
  3. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 03-22-2005, 08:10 AM
  4. Dry hands from washing so much to cath etc
    By zillazangel in forum Caregiving
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 07-28-2004, 06:29 PM
  5. Replies: 123
    Last Post: 06-01-2003, 07:06 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •