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Leif
05-31-2006, 11:12 AM
http://www.wndu.com/news/mommo/052006/mommo_50177.php



Video screens ease burden for students to witness surgery

Posted: 05/26/200603:58 pm
Last Updated: 05/26/200604:57 pm


http://images.wndu.com/news/mommo/pics/pic_50177.jpg


Medical students are now using two state of the art technologies to look over the shoulder of an experienced surgeon

The days of crowding into an operating room are almost gone.

Medical students are now using two state of the art technologies to look over the shoulder of an experienced surgeon.

Doctor Robert Spetzler is one of the world's leading neurosurgeons.

Doctor Spetzler is also a teacher, but his students aren't in the operating room.

They’re down the hall, in a cutting-edge classroom, viewing every detail of the surgery on huge TV screens, and videoconference screens bring students and teachers face to face.

“I can actually make eye contact and get a feel for the question. It’s more of a personal relationship,” said Dr. Spetzler.

The one million dollar system is only at St. Joseph’s hospital in Phoenix.

In the future, this technology will assist ER doctors at other hospitals.
This was the man that did the work inside my spinal cord. If not for him I would have been totally paralyzed by now.

Leif
05-31-2006, 11:22 AM
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=4876376&nav=7k8p



Ever think about how surgeons get their training? The days of crowding into an operating room are almost gone. Medical students are now using two state-of-the-art technologies to look over the shoulder of an experienced surgeon.
(Cutting Edge Surgery Education)
("We can turn that light off...")
Dr. Robert Spetzler is one of the world's leading neurosurgeons.
"On this side, we see the third nerve here," he instructs.
Today, he is repairing an aneurysm in this patient's brain.
"You can go ahead and inject," he continues.
Dr. Spetzler is also a teacher at Barrow Neurological Institute at St. Joseph’s Hospital in Phoenix, Arizona.
"Are you doing an ICG?" he’s asked.
"Yes we are, you should see it," he answers.
But his students aren't here in the operating room. They're down the hall, in a cutting-edge classroom --viewing every detail of the surgery on huge t-v screens. They say it's actually better than being there.
"This is pretty cool. I think it is a great opportunity," says Dr. Ruth Bristol, a future neurosurgeon.
Residents used to cram into the operating room to catch just a glimpse of a procedure.
"You are seeing the carodit artery," says Dr. Spetzler.
now microscope cameras capture every nuance and video conference screens bring students and teachers face-to-face.
"I can actually make eye contact and get a feel for the question, it's more of a personal relationship," says Dr. Spetzler.
In the future, the technology will assist e-r doctors at other hospitals.
"What we really do is teach, and this MedPrescence technology extends our ability to teach the world," says Dr. Stephen Papadopoulos, also at the Barrow Neurological Institute.
But for now, the medical students of today are using this new technology to become the surgeons of tomorrow.

The one-point-one million dollar system is only at Saint Joseph's Hospital in Phoenix right now, but will soon be expanding to other teaching hospitals.