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Steven Edwards
03-14-2006, 03:03 PM
From BodyHack (http://blog.wired.com/biotech/):


Japanese researchers have discovered a new source of stem cells: human menstrual blood. The ABC, Australia's public broadcast commission, reports (http://www.abc.net.au/science/news/health/HealthRepublish_1590861.htm) the blood engendered 30 percent more stem cells than bone marrow, a more common source of the cells.

...


After five days about half of the cells contracted "spontaneously, rhythmical and synchronously, suggesting the presence of electrical communication" between the cells, Miyoshi says.

That is to say, they behaved like heart cells.Thanks to Steven, who can't wait to hear Jon Stewart's report when the Vatican argues for this new source of ethically-acceptable cells.

NorthQuad
03-14-2006, 05:14 PM
Start saving your tampons. I'm so narsty.

carbar
03-14-2006, 05:44 PM
Is this the first such finding? That sort of surprises me. Perhaps there has been a kind of taboo about menstrual blood, but I would have thought it could have long been a logical line of research when it comes to looking for a source of stem cells.

Steven Edwards
03-14-2006, 06:07 PM
You never know... I agree that it probably wasn't due to an 'ick' factor.

Nonetheless, if replicated, this should make donating stem cells easier (as opposed to bone marrow stem cell donation).

Leif
03-14-2006, 06:32 PM
Thanks to Steven, who can't wait to hear Jon Stewart's report when the Vatican argues for this new source of ethically-acceptable cells.

Steven, what have you started here now?:D

cali
03-14-2006, 06:34 PM
:zombie: menstrual blood is definitely icky.

Steven Edwards
03-14-2006, 06:40 PM
You never know... I agree that it probably wasn't due to an 'ick' factor. Er... I meant that it probably was due to an 'ick' factor.

Oops? :)

Leif, I have done nothing. I can just imagine Jon Stewart making fun of it. Colber, too... "Menstruation ... and that's todays word!"

Trevor
03-15-2006, 12:39 AM
I can understand how menstrual blood can have stem cells. What I cant figure out is, Who would think to test it? Geez

cali
03-15-2006, 12:49 AM
yea anyway! menstrual blood has other stuff than blood in it.

NorthQuad
03-15-2006, 01:23 AM
yea anyway! menstrual blood has other stuff than blood in it.
Other stuff as in old cigarette butts or what Cali?

carbar
03-15-2006, 05:57 AM
:zombie: menstrual blood is definitely icky.


Can't see why menstrual blood should be thought of as icky or any more difficult to deal with than any other body fluid, particularly by research scientists. But then most scientists are probably male and don't have to deal with it every month anyway. Given that it is the preparation of the womb for accepting a fertilized embryo it goes without saying that it must be full of 'goodness' and nutrition, so why not stem cells?

cali
03-15-2006, 04:02 PM
Can't see why menstrual blood should be thought of as icky or any more difficult to deal with than any other body fluid, particularly by research scientists. But then most scientists are probably male and don't have to deal with it every month anyway. Given that it is the preparation of the womb for accepting a fertilized embryo it goes without saying that it must be full of 'goodness' and nutrition, so why not stem cells?

well yea you're right, it would harbor good things for stemcells, but it's just icky to the average person. i feel to be a scientist you have to be "immune" to icky stuff.

cali
03-15-2006, 04:04 PM
Other stuff as in old cigarette butts or what Cali?

o god i hope not!:zombie:

carbar
03-15-2006, 04:59 PM
but it's just icky to the average person.

Maybe I'm below average or perhaps even above (?) but personally I'd find it far more 'icky' to deal with snot!!!

cali
03-15-2006, 05:15 PM
:D snot is definitely worse! i think both things are worse when they aren't yours, ya know?

i wouldn't want to be a scientist dealing with some chick's menjstrual blood. and i wouldn't want to be a nurse wiping snot.

but if it were my own menstrual blood, it would probably be different. same goes with the snot.

roshni
03-15-2006, 06:25 PM
Let's just hope that snot doesn't hold they key to any scientific breakthroughs.

LaMemChose
03-15-2006, 06:41 PM
Can't see why menstrual blood should be thought of as icky or any more difficult to deal with than any other body fluid, particularly by research scientists. But then most scientists are probably male and don't have to deal with it every month anyway. Given that it is the preparation of the womb for accepting a fertilized embryo it goes without saying that it must be full of 'goodness' and nutrition, so why not stem cells?

Thank you. I definitely don't see an "ick" factor.

mckeownp
03-15-2006, 06:59 PM
Let's just hope that snot doesn't hold they key to any scientific breakthroughs.

Who cares if it's snot, menstral or the thrown away IVF eggs? I'd cut off my head if my son could walk again!

jimnms
03-15-2006, 09:23 PM
Isn't an egg destroyed in the menstral cycle? I'm sure some psyco-religious group will object to using the blood for medical research. :rolleyes:

cali
03-15-2006, 09:31 PM
i always think of that too, technically all women with a menstrual cycle are murderers if that were actually true...

teesieme
03-15-2006, 11:45 PM
[QUOTE=jimnms]Isn't an egg destroyed in the menstral cycle? QUOTE]\

Was thinking that when first seeing thread...hmmm, it sure makes one wonder when you think about it more and more doesn't it? Wisey?

Wise Young
03-16-2006, 05:14 AM
Yikes, women are full of good things...

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/527401


Menstrual Blood Shows Good Potential as Stem Cell Source

By Martha Kerr

ATLANTA (Reuters Health) Mar 13 - Japanese researchers have harvested endometrial stem cells from human menstrual blood. These stem cells have "an extremely higher potential" as a source of cardiomyocytes compared with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells, they reported at a late-breaker clinical trials session here Sunday at the 55th Scientific Sessions of the American College of Cardiology.

The findings were presented by Dr. Shunichiro Miyoshi on behalf of his colleagues at Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo. The researchers collected menstrual blood from six women and harvested endometrial stem cells.

They were able to obtain 30 million stem cells from a single menstrual blood cell, compared with a rate of approximately one million stem cells from marrow-derived blood cells, making them a better source of cardiomyocytes, Dr. Miyoshi told Reuters Health.

The endometrial stem cells expressed a high level of cardiac-specific genes. After 5 days of cardiomyocyte induction, about half of the cells contracted "spontaneously, rhythmical and synchronously, suggesting the presence of electrical communication" between the cells, Dr. Miyoshi announced.

Measurements of membrane potential showed action potentials with cardiac pacemaker potential. The cells stained positive for cardiac troponin-I with a striation pattern. After 5 days of induction, these cells made up 24.6% of the total population of stem cells.

Dr. Miyoshi said that marrow-derived stem cells have improved cardiac function, but primarily through neovascularization rather than through cardiomyogenesis. He emphasized that it is important that these cells are derived from younger patients, rather than autologous cells derived from the typically older patients with heart failure. The cells from younger donors should have longer cell division time, reaching senescence later than cells harvested from older donors.

antiquity
03-16-2006, 05:22 AM
Hmm, I wonder if neuronal precursor cells exist in endometrial tissue.

carbar
03-16-2006, 06:01 AM
Yikes, women are full of good things...



No surprise in that!!!!!!!!!!


(by the way, already another thread on this topic)

Wise Young
03-16-2006, 06:31 AM
No surprise in that!!!!!!!!!!

(by the way, already another thread on this topic)

Carbar,

Menstrual blood contains the sloughing of the endometrium of the uterus. Most of the cells are dead but there appears to be some cells that behave like stem cells and have enormous growth potential. This is not particularly surprising since fertile women have to go through the cycles for some 30 years of their life, perhaps a average of 300 times. Grow and then slough. It is not so surprising that they have stem cells that produce a variety cells.

Previously, some people have speculated that the unfertilized egg (unimplanted) is also in menstrual blood and have suggested that one should try to collect stem cells from them (Source (http://www.rochester-citynews.com/gyrobase/Content?oid=oid%3A4156)). It is an interesting idea. Unfertilized eggs, however, do not develop into blastocysts and therefore do not have embryonic stem cells. On the other hand, there may be fertilized unimplanted eggs in menstrual blood. I imagine that many people might consider this "yukky". I wonder if any religious organization would object to that. I imagine that there will be many volunteers. Perhaps some manufacturer could make a device that could collect menstrual flow and freeze the cells to send to a national collection center somewhere...

Wise.

teesieme
03-16-2006, 01:13 PM
[QUOTE=
On the other hand, there may be fertilized unimplanted eggs in menstrual blood.QUOTE]

I wonder how often this actually does happen really. It is a rather interesting idea, isn't it?

Lindox
03-16-2006, 06:39 PM
We better invest in Tampon squeegies.

carbar
03-18-2006, 10:54 AM
In the first study, the team collected menstrual blood from six women to obtain a sample of endometrial cells (E-DOM). The researchers found that approximately half of the E-DOM cells contracted simultaneously, suggesting an electrical communication between the cells. Further analyses of the cells revealed appropriate cardiac gene expression and action potential, as well as sustained and significant positive cardiac troponin-1, a calcium-regulated protein in muscle tissue, and connexin 43, a protein that assists in intracellular interactions The in vitro data suggests that stem cells from this source have significant CM potential and are potentially valuable not only because they can be easily collected from young volunteers, but also because of their collection-efficacy. A single sample of the menstrual blood returns a large number of stem cells.

TAKEN FROM ARTICLE:
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/medicalnews.php?newsid=39522

Mee
03-20-2006, 01:52 AM
Wonderful !!!

http://www.abc.net.au/science/news/health/HealthRepublish_1590861.htm




Menstrual blood yields stem cells


Martha Kerr
Reuters

Tuesday, 14 March 2006


http://www.abc.net.au/science/news/img/health/youngwoman070306.jpg
Stem cells harvested from young women's menstrual blood have a longer lifespan than those from older women (Image: iStockphoto)

Japanese researchers have harvested stem cells from human menstrual blood, a medical conference has heard.

The researchers say these stem cells could be coaxed into forming specialised heart cells, which might one-day be used to treat failing or damaged hearts.

At the meeting of the American College of Cardiology (http://www.acc.org/), Dr Shunichiro Miyoshi reported that he and his colleagues at Keio University (http://www.keio.ac.jp/) in Tokyo collected menstrual blood from six women and harvested stem cells that originated in the lining of the uterus.

They were able to obtain about 30 times more stem cells from menstrual blood than from bone marrow, Miyoshi says.

The stem cells were then cultured in a way to induce them to become heart cells.

After five days about half of the cells contracted "spontaneously, rhythmical and synchronously, suggesting the presence of electrical communication" between the cells, Miyoshi says.

That is to say, they behaved like heart cells.

The researcher explains that already stem cells derived from bone marrow have improved heart function, mainly by producing new blood vessels rather than new heart-muscle tissue.

He emphasises that it is important that these cells be obtained from younger patients, because they would have a longer lifespan than cells harvested from older donors.