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Leif
11-30-2005, 06:38 PM
http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20051130/hl_nm/france_transplant_dc_5

Just whatced this news on TV.




By Catherine Lagrange 2 hours, 7 minutes ago


LYON, France (Reuters) - French surgeons have performed what they said on Wednesday was the world's first partial face transplant -- giving a new nose, chin and lips to a woman savaged by a dog.

Specialists from two French hospitals carried out the operation on a 38-year-old woman on Sunday in the northern city of Amiens by grafting on tissues, muscles, arteries and veins from a brain-dead woman.
"The patient is in an excellent state and the transplant looks normal," the hospitals said in a brief statement after waiting three days to announce the pioneering surgery.
The woman, who was not identified, had been left without a nose and lips after the dog attacked her last May, and was unable to talk or chew properly.
The statement did not say what the woman would look like when she had fully recovered, but medical experts said she was unlikely to resemble the donor.
The operation was led by Jean-Michel Dubernard, a specialist from a hospital in Lyon who has also carried out hand transplants, and Bernard Devauchelle from the Amiens hospital.
Stephen Wigmore, chair of the British Transplantation Society's ethics committee, said teams in France, the United States and Britain had been developing techniques to make face transplants a reality.
Skin transplants have long been used to treat burns and other injuries, but operations around the mouth and nose have been considered very difficult because of the area's high sensitivity to foreign tissue.
ETHICAL QUESTIONS
Iain Hutchins, a facial surgeon and head of the research charity Saving Faces -- The Facial Surgery Research Foundation, said that, although such medical advances should be celebrated, the transplant had thrown up moral and ethical issues.
"This was a quality of life' operation rather than a life-saving operation and has many implications for the recipient's and donor's families," he said.
There was a short-term risk for the patient if blood vessels became blocked, a medium-term danger of her body rejecting the donor tissue and a long-term possibility that the drugs used in the operation could cause cancers.
"She could be back to square one, without a face, needing further reconstruction operations," he said.
Experts say the microsurgery techniques needed for the face transplant are well established, but that little is known about the psychological impact and the long-term risk of the drugs the woman will have to take to avoid rejecting her new face.
Peter Butler, a plastic surgeon at the Royal Free Hospital in London who has researched face transplants, said he believed the nose, lips and chin had been transplanted as a complete unit, and the prognosis was probably good.
"The likelihood is that it is not going to change the facial identity very much as long as they have matched for skin tone and texture," he said.
"Aesthetically it would look pretty good if it heals. The question is how will it work. That is an unknown because we don't know if they transplanted nerves with it."
(Additional reporting by Patricia Reaney in London)

carbar
12-16-2005, 09:46 AM
http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/story/0,3605,1668774,00.html

I find this so spooky. I know that there must be some very needy cases for this - e.g. those who have severe burns - but the idea of having someone else's face just goes beyond my imagination. To look in the mirror and see someone else...... I just can't grasp what it must be like.

Leif
12-16-2005, 10:07 AM
Carbar – Bill Gates maybe:)

I know what you say here, but if a man has a beard or a moustache and shave it of, it will be a little bit strange in the beginning. If I injured my face, like the lower part was gone I would have liked very much to have a new part transplanted – maybe I would have been happier with it as well – who knows (lol). We do transplant organs inside the body, I guess that will feel a bit special for those who have to do this as well although a new face is a bit special – maybe it would not have been like that if the mirrors was not invented :thinking:

PS. Maybe the cosmetic industry will jump this one – like when people gets old and wrinkled many today will do and pay anything to change that we gets older (I would not, I think). Maybe this will lead to that those peoples can have a brand new and young and fresh face – what do you think?

lynnifer
01-11-2006, 05:20 AM
she is regaining feeling in her face

http://www.cnn.com/2006/HEALTH/conditions/01/10/face.transplant.ap/index.html

carbar
01-29-2006, 11:21 AM
http://www.2loop.com/articles/faceplant.html

lynnifer
02-06-2006, 12:01 PM
http://www.cnn.com/2006/HEALTH/02/06/face.transplant/index.html

She must not have the nerve-muscle movement yet of being able to smile? I imagine she must drool a lot?

LaMemChose
02-06-2006, 01:40 PM
In the photos of the woman before the dog attack and post operatively, she does not look so different, other than her mouth which now droops. She would have had some musculature and bone structure for the transplant to have taken so I think she'd still resermble herself and does. Before the dog attack her skin was pretty weathered and it's now smooth.

The dog attack took her mouth and much of her nose. I'm sure the nerve damage was quite extensive.

Reports indicate she could not talk or eat before surgery. Even though she slurs her words now it is an improvement for her.

I hope her body doesn't reject the transplanted tissues. What she's endured is no small amount of hell.

roshni
02-06-2006, 02:05 PM
She seems markedly composed for someone who has undergone such a dramatic procedure.

Leif
02-06-2006, 02:26 PM
Just did see here on TV. Seams like she has contact with some of the muscles but is lacking some fine motor control, this may improve hopefully over time if and when the nerves are getting better. I don’t know but hopes so. I Thought she was doing pretty good consider what she went trough as well.

Buck_Nasty
02-06-2006, 02:32 PM
http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/story/0,3605,1668774,00.html

I find this so spooky. I know that there must be some very needy cases for this - e.g. those who have severe burns - but the idea of having someone else's face just goes beyond my imagination. To look in the mirror and see someone else...... I just can't grasp what it must be like.

I saw a story about this on Discovery Health a few months ago
and I remember that they talked about what the person would
look like after the procedure. The Dr.'s said that there would be
some resemblance of the donor, but bone structure is what makes
people look different, so the person recieving the new face would
not look like the donor. I thinks it's great and offers a lot of hope
to severe burn victims and others with facial trauma or deformities.