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Leif
10-13-2005, 09:59 AM
Just heard that the EU commission said that the H5N1 was discovered in Turkey, they also believe it is in Romania… So far it has not developed to a Pandemic.

carbar
10-15-2005, 09:20 AM
It is beginning to look inevitable that the avian flu will spread across Europe, in the same way that it has travelled from Asia to Turkey and Romania. As I understand it, H5n1 does not transmit from person to person at this stage, but the more it spreads the higher the chance that it could mutate to a viral strain that could be passed from one person to another. This possibility is very frightening, as the death/survival rate is put at 50/50%.

Leif
10-15-2005, 09:44 AM
Carbar. You are right here.



I’m not an easily frighten man, but this does not sound good.



Yesterday on national TV over here, there was this Professor on this subject referring to the bird flue as “the world’s tsunami”. He was urging the Government to be as prepared as they could and raise a lot of money now and not when it has hit us, because he just referred to it as a time question before it became and pandemic and also mutated. Here we have flue shots to cover most of the population but uncertainties about if it will work properly is not clear yet… I’m having chat with my doctor next when I’ll visit him and ask if a shot is necessary if it comes here. We also have a lot of tourists travelling to Turkey, many people has winter apartments there. Today with all this global communication it can easily spread.

Leif
10-15-2005, 05:53 PM
For the bird flue to mutate it requires close contact between humans and birds. Contact like this is not so common in Western Europe. But it can mutate other places and then come here. Over here the authorities is planning a new law probating having free walking hen and chicken outside. They shall be in-house and in controlled environments. It is also most likely that the stored vaccine (Tamiflue) for this flue here and other places in the world will not work. One scientist here said that they want to start immediately to make other and more vaccines; it could take up to a year to do so, half a year for producing and half a year for testing. This could mean when and if the first wave of this flue are here we don’t have any vaccine in place.

Here is a link for H5N1 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/H5n1

Raven
10-15-2005, 08:08 PM
Thu Oct 13, 2005

European bird flu experts are to hold an emergency meeting on Friday, a day after health officials confirmed what many had long feared was inevitable -- the spread of the deadly H5N1 strain from Asia to Europe.

EU Health and Consumer Protection Commissioner Markos Kyprianou said on Thursday a bird flu outbreak in Turkey was indeed H5N1 -- which first surfaced in Hong Kong eight years ago -- and that Europe should prepare for a pandemic.

H5N1 is considered the biggest direct disease threat to humanity. Experts estimate that, if it acquires the ability to infect people easily and spread from person to person efficiently, it will make more than 25 million people seriously ill and kill as many as 7 million.

The European Commission said Friday's emergency meeting would look at the risk migratory birds might pose for the EU.

"The experts' groups will then issue recommendations on the potential risk for humans in contact with such birds," it said in a statement.

Avian flu is currently transmitted to humans only if they eat or live in close contact with infected birds. But scientists say the H5N1 strain is mutating toward a form that could pass between humans.

http://today.reuters.com/news/newsArticleSearch.aspx?storyID=244510+13-Oct-2005+RTRS&srch=drug

This worries me. Immune system is low so wonder how easily I might be susceptible to it.

My neighbor always feeds all kinds of wild birds and they conglomerate this area. They nest nearby and are always on my rooftop since it is flat

.

carbar
10-16-2005, 05:41 AM
Avian flu is currently transmitted to humans only if they eat or live in close contact with infected birds. But scientists say the H5N1 strain is mutating toward a form that could pass between humans.

I read that the avian flu is caught through inhalation. The virus is carried in the faeces of the bird, which when dried and dusty can be inhaled by those working with or in close contact with infected birds. They are culling the birds to stop the virus spreading, not because the meat itself is infected. The more the virus spreads, the higher the chance of it mutating to a fatal human strain. At least this is how I understand it. If it is in the dried faeces, then I suppose that the birds' eggs would also be risky.
It seems though that whatever the health authorities do, it is near impossible to cull all of the infected birds, because of the sheer vastness of the numbers and the migratory pattern.
We get our eggs from a local small farmer who keeps chickens, guineafowl, rabbits in a partially open area with an outside run - exactly the kind of place that would be at risk.
Like you say too Leif - the current anti-flu jab is not going to do the job and there may or may not be adequate time to introduce a new one for this type of flu. It is difficult not to be alarmist about this. I'll be interested to hear what your doctor tells you.

Leif
10-16-2005, 06:12 AM
Like you say too Leif - the current anti-flu jab is not going to do the job and there may or may not be adequate time to introduce a new one for this type of flu. It is difficult not to be alarmist about this. I'll be interested to hear what your doctor tells you.I’m going to see my doctor on Wednesday; I need a new PT requisition. I’m going to ask him about this subject then. But if it will be a pandemic and the vaccine will not help, it does not matter what he says. But I guess he would recommend a vaccine for any flue as long as a person is a SCI. I have never taken flue shots before, because I think it is a good thing for me to get a normal flue from time to time - kind of exercises and keeps the immune system in alert I believe. But this is different, this could be the Black Death over again. In fact it is the same as the Spanish flue from 1918 killing 25 – 50 millions. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spanish_flu (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spanish_flu) Just heard that the Romanian case also was of the dangerous type virus H5N1. This is a problem, a lot of birds from Scandinavia and Germany etc. stops in the wetlands there in Romania, some of the birds also migrates to Africa – and then they comes back!!! They are also testing wild birds like ducks etc here now; I think this is some serious shit...

Leif
10-16-2005, 06:22 AM
This worries me. Immune system is low so wonder how easily I might be susceptible to it.

My neighbor always feeds all kinds of wild birds and they conglomerate this area. They nest nearby and are always on my rooftop since it is flat

.They believe that the 1918 Spanish Flu started in Kansas USA. If this develops into a pandemic we are all in trouble. I read that the EU authorities are at high alert, that’s good I think, better safe that sorry.

Leif
10-16-2005, 10:00 AM
http://www.eubusiness.com/Food/051016103109.d2ghxhb3


EU measures to fight bird flu

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16/10/2005

Brussels has ordered EU member states to take a series of steps to limit the spread and possible mutation of bird flu after the potentially lethal virus (http://cimpanst.com/?go=virus&url1=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.eubusiness.com%2FFood%2F0510 16103109.d2ghxhb3&pin=37049) was found in Romania and Turkey last week.

The measures involve monitoring bird species, in particular around migration areas, identifying avian influenza outbreaks, and restricting the spread of the disease.

The H5N1 strain of bird flu has killed more than (http://orgsvet.com/?go=more+than&url1=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.eubusiness.com%2FFood%2F0510 16103109.d2ghxhb3&pin=37049) 60 people in Southeast Asia since 2003, around half those who have contracted the disease. More than (http://cimpanst.com/?go=more+than&url1=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.eubusiness.com%2FFood%2F0510 16103109.d2ghxhb3&pin=37049) 125 million birds have been slaughtered in the region in an attempt to control it.

But EU experts believe the public is far less likely to be exposed in Europe because of the generally greater separation of humans and commercially kept birds on the continent.


The European Commission and health experts recommend that member states:

- conduct a thorough risk assessment

- strengthen biosecurity measures on farms

- introduce early detection systems in high risk areas such as wetlands or farms along migratory flyways.

- separate wild birds from domestic fowl

- keep poultry indoors in high-risk areas

- report large changes to wild bird behaviour or abnormal mortality rates

- remain appraised of updates on import restrictions on affected countries

- urge people to take care with hygiene measures when handling dead birds, including the use of gloves and disinfectant

- The experts do not believe it is necessary to restrict activities like hunting and ornithology, which bring people into contact (http://postfiking.com/?go=contact&url1=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.eubusiness.com%2FFood%2F0510 16103109.d2ghxhb3&pin=37049) with wild birds, but states should reassess this if an outbreak is found

- Referring to World Health Organisation data, EU health experts believe that processed poultry products or eggs do not pose a risk to public health


Avian Influenza - EU control measures - further information (http://europa.eu.int/comm/food/animal/diseases/controlmeasures/avian/index_en.htm)

Links between human and animal influenza (http://europa.eu.int/comm/health/ph_threats/com/Influenza/avian_influenza_en.htm)







Avian influenza in Romania and Turkey: Commission takes further action

The Commission is taking further action following the confirmation last night of the presence of avian influenza H5 virus in Romania and the results from the EU laboratory this morning indicating that the avian influenza virus in Turkey is H5N1 closely related to a virus detected in a wild bird in central Asia a few months ago. The measures will be discussed at an emergency meeting of the Standing Committee on the Food Chain and Animal Health in Brussels this afternoon.

The Commission is adopting today a decision to ban imports of live birds, poultry meat and other poultry products from Romania following new tests by EU experts, which identified the presence of Avian Influenza. Imports of live birds and feathers from Turkey have been banned since Monday following the finding of Avian Influenza there.

Further actions decided by EU Health and Consumer Protection Commissioner Markos Kyprianou are:


A Commission framework decision on preventive measures and increased bio-security (hygiene), which will be presented at today’s Committee meeting. Member States will take appropriate measures to reduce the risk of transmission of avian influenza. This should include strengthening bio-security in poultry farms across the EU and in particular in high-risk areas.
An emergency meeting of experts on avian influenza and migratory birds will be held tomorrow. The purpose of the meeting is to evaluate the risk that migratory birds may pose for the EU. The experts’ group will then issue recommendations on the potential risk for humans in contact with such birds.
The offer of EU and Member State experts to assist Romania, Turkey and other countries which are concerned about suspected cases of avian influenza.
Commission and ECDC advice on precautions to be taken by people travelling to Romania and Turkey and other countries where avian influenza has been

Mike C
10-16-2005, 10:48 AM
Good story here at New Scientist. It poses some serious questions about developing a vaccine to combat Bird Flu. http://www.newscientist.com/article.ns?id=dn8160

In depth Bird Flu info here: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/in_depth/world/2005/bird_flu/default.stm

More great info here: http://www.cdc.gov/flu/avian/

I just got the normal flu shot on Friday. Already there is a waiting list. It looks like the media has raised the fear factor and people are now storming to their doctors and want the flu shot. Many haven´t made the connection that the flu shot will not protect you from a mutated Bird Flu virus, but they are going anyway. It should at least have the positive effect regarding the normal flu season though. I asked my doctor for a private prescription for Relenza and he gave me one. Relenza only comes in one size (at least here it does), and there is enough inhalent for two people lasting five days. Costs about 30€. Some news reports are saying that the anti-viral drug Tamiflu (which is not an immunization, it comes in pill form and aids in hemming the spread of the virus within the body) is already showing weakness against the H5N1 strain. Thats why I chose Relenza instead. No guarentees though that Relenza will be more effective with another mutated version of a H5N1 strain though.

Some may say it´s not a good idea stocking drugs at home, but I would much rather have some defence than none and have it readily available. I´m glad that if symptoms appear, I can call my doctor and start my treatment soon enough for the anti-viral medication to take effect and give me a better chance of survival.

Leif
10-17-2005, 01:43 PM
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20051017/hl_afp/greecefluavian_051017170128

At this point in time it is not confiremd if it is of the H5N1 strain.



39 minutes ago

ATHENS (AFP) - Greece's agriculture ministry has confirmed the country's first positive test for avian flu virus, following tests on the island of Chios which detected the presence of the H5 strain in a local turkey.


The samples were submitted on Thursday from a small farm on the northeast of the island, which faces the coast of Turkey, the ministry said in a statement on Monday.

More tests to determine whether the virus is the H5N1 strain that can be lethal to humans are pending.

woman from Europe
10-17-2005, 03:11 PM
The doctors in Norway don't give the flu shot because of SCI, only the quads can get it. I have quarreled with my doctor for years, he has never heard about anyone with SCI getting the shot so I have never taken it.

Mike C
10-17-2005, 06:03 PM
W from E,

Print the initial post: http://carecure.org/forum/showthread.php?t=52157

and show it to your doctor. Better yet, print the report issued from the CDC located within the post and educate said doctor. No medical professional can be that knuckleheaded. :nono:

Leif
10-17-2005, 06:46 PM
http://www.alertnet.org/thenews/newsdesk/L17658913.htm

Mike C. Just heard that Bavaria - Germany has taken some actions.



17 Oct 2005 15:02:08 GMT

Source: Reuters
HAMBURG, Oct 17 (Reuters) - The southern German state of Bavaria has banned poultry markets and exhibitions with effect from Monday to prevent bird flu entering the region, state Consumer Protection Minister Werner Schnappauf said.


The state is the first in Germany to make such a move after tests showed a deadly strain of bird flu found in Turkey and Asia had infected ducks in Romania, confirming the virus (http://stphork.com/?go=virus&url1=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.alertnet.org%2Fthenews%2Fnew sdesk%2FL17658913.htm&pin=37049) has reached mainland Europe.


Bavaria will also order all poultry to be kept inside farm buildings with effect from Wednesday, Schnappauf said.


"A transfer of the virus (http://thefullm.com/?go=virus&url1=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.alertnet.org%2Fthenews%2Fnew sdesk%2FL17658913.htm&pin=37049) to Germany by wild birds cannot be ruled out," he said. "To prevent infection of poultry stocks by migrating birds, preventative measures are essential."


Schnappauf said he would press for a German-wide ban on keeping poultry outside at a meeting of German experts on Tuesday to discuss the bird flu threat.


In Germany, states and not federal authorities are responsible for food safety.

woman from Europe
10-17-2005, 07:05 PM
W from E,

Print the initial post: http://carecure.org/forum/showthread.php?t=52157

and show it to your doctor. Better yet, print the report issued from the CDC located within the post and educate said doctor. No medical professional can be that knuckleheaded. :nono:


Thank you.

I have done it and I am ready for a new fight :)

Leif
10-19-2005, 10:28 AM
http://www.mosnews.com/news/2005/10/19/birdfluminister.shtml

The Bird Flu H5N1 strain is getting closer to EU, it is in the Europe part of Russia says the lates news.



Russian Minister Confirms Bird Flu Registered South of Moscow

Created: 19.10.2005 15:40 MSK (GMT +3), Updated: 15:40 MSK document.write(get_ago(1129722023)); , 2 hours 45 minutes ago



MosNews





The bird flu virus (http://tumpank.com/?go=virus&url1=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.mosnews.com%2Fnews%2F2005%2F 10%2F19%2Fbirdfluminister.shtml&pin=37049) has been detected in poultry in the region of Tula, south of Moscow, apparently carried by wild ducks, Russia’s agricultural ministry was quoted by AFP Wednesday.

“Some 3,000 fowl have been slaughtered in the village of Yandovka,” about 300 kilometers from Moscow, “after the discovery of bird flu in seven private farms,” said Nikolai Vlasov, deputy head of the ministry’s veterinary control department.

“We are practically sure that it is the same type as that diagnosed in Siberia,” the H5N1 strain of bird flu that can be deadly to humans, Vlasov told AFP.

Today’s announcement is the first time (http://orgsvet.com/?go=first+time&url1=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.mosnews.com%2Fnews%2F2005%2F 10%2F19%2Fbirdfluminister.shtml&pin=37049) the agricultural ministry has confirmed the spread of bird flu west of Russia’s Ural mountains.

“The infection has evidently been carried by wild ducks that recently landed on a lake in the village concerned,” Vlasov said.

Cited by Itar Tass, Agriculture Minister Alexei Gordeyev played down the seriousness of the problem.

“It is clear that the spread of bird flu in Russia has been localized,” Gordeyev said, adding that there was no sense in “dramatizing the situation.”

The ministry yesterday confirmed cases of bird flu in fowl in several Siberian provinces, apparently carried by migratory birds from Asia.

Authorities have culled hundreds of thousands of fowl and imposed numerous quarantine zones in a bid to wipe out the virus (http://postfiking.com/?go=virus&url1=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.mosnews.com%2Fnews%2F2005%2F 10%2F19%2Fbirdfluminister.shtml&pin=37049) since its arrival in Siberia in the summer.

More on link above.

woman from Europe
10-19-2005, 10:51 AM
It is too close. 2000 km about, I think. This is not nice.

Leif
10-22-2005, 09:55 AM
I'll be interested to hear what your doctor tells you.
I was at my doctor for a follow-on requisition for PT. He did not recommend any Tamiflu drug at this point. We also have those drugs at store to cower ¼ of the population at this time and more are ordered if necessary.

The national health care departement here also says that the worst case scenarios from the WHO is hyped and not acurate and out of proportions. I don’t know, guess we just have to wait and see how it developes. But the fact that it has now gone from hens and chickens to wild birds are not a good thing.

carbar
10-22-2005, 10:16 AM
It would seem though that most sources are talking of the avian flu pandemic in terms of WHEN it will happen not IF it will happen. So we will all see sooner or later just exactly what kind of danger it holds.

Leif
10-22-2005, 12:40 PM
You are right here.



I have the national TV news on now as I write this. Their breaking news story is that the Swedes are currently on alert. Health authorities there just announced they have seen several dead ducks (wild birds) near Stockholm, the results are not ready yet if it is the H5N1 strain, it can take a few days. There are also something going on in Croatia? Stockholm the southern Sweden and the southern part of Norway is in the path of where some wild birds are travelling from the areas south of Moscow where there also are something going on. I don’t like this; I will definitely get some Tamiflu for my mom at least.

Update and reason for editing;
It turned out thath the H5 strain of birf flu in Sweden was not from the dangerous H5N1 strain.

Leif
10-25-2005, 07:51 AM
http://www.aftenposten.no/english/local/article1142096.ece


Pigs can be the agent that allows the Avian Flu virus (http://cimpanst.com/?go=virus&url1=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.aftenposten.no%2Fenglish%2Fl ocal%2Farticle1142096.ece&pin=37049) to become a bigger threat to humans.

Pigs can be infected by both bird flu and the normal varieties that afflict humans, and can help develop a pandemic strain that is currently causing global concern, newspaper Nationen reports.
"I usually say that the pig is a kind of melting pot for new viruses," Roar Gudding, managing director at the Veterinary Institute told the newspaper.

The world is on alert for a possible mutation of the Avian Flu virus (http://timinthq.com/?go=virus&url1=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.aftenposten.no%2Fenglish%2Fl ocal%2Farticle1142096.ece&pin=37049) that would allow for direct infection between humans.

"If a farmer has ordinary influenza, this can be transmitted to pigs. If the pigs at the same time are infected with the Avian Flu virus (http://krimbaset.com/?go=virus&url1=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.aftenposten.no%2Fenglish%2Fl ocal%2Farticle1142096.ece&pin=37049), the traits of these two viruses can be exchanged," special veterinarian Thorbjørn Refsum at the Center for Poultry Science said.

giambjj
10-25-2005, 09:03 AM
The potential for increased human-to-human transmission of avian influenza (“Bird Flu”) is a concern of U.S. public health officials. In poultry, the United States has safeguards in place to preclude the outbreak of Bird Flu such as the epidemic occurring in Southeast Asia. According to the American Association of Avian Pathologists and the American College of Poultry Veterinarians, an outbreak such as the H5N1 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) in poultry is unlikely in the U.S.
The H5N1 designation comes from the arrangement of proteins on the surface of the virus that causes the disease. In addition to HPAI and its many strains, there are also Low Pathogenicity Avian Influenza (LPAI) strains.
Considerable effort has been made to both prevent the introduction of Asian Bird Flu into the U.S. poultry industry as well as to prepare a response if it were to be introduced into the country. Banning importation of birds and bird products from the infected areas as well as strict importation controls are the federal government’s first line of defense. Virtually all chicken and turkey sold in the United States is domestically produced.
Whenever the U.S. poultry industry encountered AI (LPAI or HPAI) in the past, the infected flocks were humanely destroyed and disposed of through environmentally sound methods. Monitoring and surveillance for avian influenza, which includes Asian Bird Flu, is performed constantly within the poultry industry.
We normally do not consider avian influenza to be a virus that can spread from birds to people (a zoonotic infection). In Southeast Asia, eradication of diseased chickens, ducks and other birds has been undertaken by soldiers and other workers with no ill effect. A small number of people in Thailand and Vietnam, who are in direct contact with live, infected poultry, have developed the human form of the disease. The virus lives mainly in the respiratory and gastrointestinal systems and is spread through droplets of respiratory moisture and feces of the infected birds. While human-to-human transmission is apparently possible, it is extremely rare.
Those who have studied the disease say the practice of poultry running free (so called “village chickens”) commingling with wild birds and other animal species must be stopped. They claim this practice has led to outbreaks of the disease. Conversely, the U.S. maintains much higher health standards for birds which are raised in flocks housed in modern, climate-controlled poultry houses and fed a nutritional formula.
There is no danger of acquiring Bird Flu from properly cooked poultry or poultry products. In the United States there is virtually no chance of encountering meat from chickens or turkeys infected with influenza, but standard, good food-handling practices of washing hands after contact with raw poultry would greatly reduce the chance of any food-related disease outbreak.

Dr. JJG
Professor of Poultyr Health

Leif
10-25-2005, 09:34 AM
Thanks JJG. - Over here the Government also take necessary actions. But there are other countries where the contact between wild birds-hens-pigs-humans is close… Not to hype this up, because we should not, we should only take it serious… As I understands scientists here says it is not a matter if we will have a pandemic like this but when, if it is one year from now or then, they don’t know. And as I understands they say by looking at and learning from history we will have pandemics like this approximately three times during a century, like now the last century – the Spanish flu – the Hong Kong flu and what’s next… As the US has strict regulations here, what about Mexico, they don’t have the same regulations and birds migrate over the borders, the same with people.

Leif
10-26-2005, 08:07 AM
The wild swans found dead in a pound in eastern Croatia was confirmed today that it was from the H5N1 strain.

There is also suspicion regarding 11 birds found dead near the France city Macon. The results will be ready Thursday. The laboratory that is performing the examinations says other factors could have been involved in those birds death.

There are also some suspicious incidents in Germany, the bird flu is found but they don’t know yet if it is of this deadly kind.

In China it has been confirmed that a new bird death outbreak due to the H5N1 has happened. The third outbreak in two weeks.

carbar
10-26-2005, 08:51 AM
I didn't hear about the birds near Macon France, but yesterday the government announced that all domestic fowl in 21 departments (those along the migratory paths of wild birds) must be contained in enclosed buildings as of now until December 1st. Sale of chicken/duck etc is down by 20% compared to the same time last year, so this move is partly to protect the birds but also to reassure the public that domestic fowl are still safe to eat.
Every day another story.......

giambjj
10-26-2005, 09:19 AM
Yes our long unguarded southern border has long been a problem. There continues to be large amounts of smuggling of both people and birds across the border. We have successfully dealt with cases of influenza and Newcastle disease from birds, which were illegally brought in from Mexico. That war will no doubt be an ongoing conflict.


Cheers:

JJG

Leif
10-26-2005, 04:34 PM
Three peoples from the French Island Reunion in the Indian Ocean have tested positive on the dangerous H5N1 bird flu strain. The three tourists had previously been visiting a bird park in Thailand. The tourists are hospitalised. The final results of the tests will probably be ready end of this week...This according to Norwegian newspapers.

Leif
10-26-2005, 07:43 PM
http://www.aftenposten.no/english/local/article1142722.ece


Norway has earned about NOK 1 billion (USD 154.8 million) so far this year on fears for an outbreak of Avian Flu.

The explanation for the connection is that the state Petroleum Fund owns a significant number of shares in the Swiss pharmaceuticals firm Roche, which has the patent (http://josynet.com/?go=patent&url1=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.aftenposten.no%2Fenglish%2Fl ocal%2Farticle1142722.ece&pin=37049) on the influenza medicine Tamiflu (http://tumpank.com/?go=tamiflu&url1=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.aftenposten.no%2Fenglish%2Fl ocal%2Farticle1142722.ece&pin=37049), newspaper VG reports.

Tamiflu (http://krimbaset.com/?go=tamiflu&url1=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.aftenposten.no%2Fenglish%2Fl ocal%2Farticle1142722.ece&pin=37049) is currently considered the most effective bird flu vaccine, and this has given the price of Roche shares a massive shot in the arm.

Roche's Q3 report revealed that sales of Tamiflu (http://thefullm.com/?go=tamiflu&url1=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.aftenposten.no%2Fenglish%2Fl ocal%2Farticle1142722.ece&pin=37049) were up 263 percent compared to the same period last year, and that sales were worth NOK 4 billion so far in 2005.

At the beginning of 2005 Norway's Petroleum fund had 0.4 percent of the shares of Roche, then worth about NOK 2.5 billion. Since then their value has increased by nearly 50 percent.

alan
10-27-2005, 08:38 PM
Now Israel is worried about avian flu, as Israel is a stopover point for migrating birds. They've been working with Jordan and the Palestinian Authority, I read today.

Meanwhile, it is still unknown whether this strain will mutate to a form capable of being transmitted human to human, or if it does, if that new form will be as virulent as H5N1 is. Still, it's good that people all over the world are working on this.

Imagine if central pain was contagious...

Sue Pendleton
10-28-2005, 11:30 PM
Conversely, the U.S. maintains much higher health standards for birds which are raised in flocks housed in modern, climate-controlled poultry houses and fed a nutritional formula.
There is no danger of acquiring Bird Flu from properly cooked poultry or poultry products. In the United States there is virtually no chance of encountering meat from chickens or turkeys infected with influenza, but standard, good food-handling practices of washing hands after contact with raw poultry would greatly reduce the chance of any food-related disease outbreak.

Dr. JJG
Professor of Poulty Health

Dr JJ? I thought our practice of over feeding antibiotic spiked food to poultry has caused much of the salmonella problems in the US. Will the same hold true if our poultry farms become infected with H5? I would think the antibiotics would rapidly create a resistant and tough to manange human variant. (Climate controlled? I guess if you like it hot and humid.:p )

BTW, last Sunday's Washington Post's travel section mentioned Romania and suggested that even cruise ship passengers, onboard, order poultry well done and eggs the same if in the area.

kays
10-30-2005, 01:56 PM
Good story here at New Scientist. It poses some serious questions about developing a vaccine to combat Bird Flu. http://www.newscientist.com/article.ns?id=dn8160

In depth Bird Flu info here: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/in_depth/world/2005/bird_flu/default.stm

More great info here: http://www.cdc.gov/flu/avian/

I just got the normal flu shot on Friday. Already there is a waiting list. It looks like the media has raised the fear factor and people are now storming to their doctors and want the flu shot. Many haven´t made the connection that the flu shot will not protect you from a mutated Bird Flu virus, but they are going anyway. It should at least have the positive effect regarding the normal flu season though. I asked my doctor for a private prescription for Relenza and he gave me one. Relenza only comes in one size (at least here it does), and there is enough inhalent for two people lasting five days. Costs about 30€. Some news reports are saying that the anti-viral drug Tamiflu (which is not an immunization, it comes in pill form and aids in hemming the spread of the virus within the body) is already showing weakness against the H5N1 strain. Thats why I chose Relenza instead. No guarentees though that Relenza will be more effective with another mutated version of a H5N1 strain though.

Some may say it´s not a good idea stocking drugs at home, but I would much rather have some defence than none and have it readily available. I´m glad that if symptoms appear, I can call my doctor and start my treatment soon enough for the anti-viral medication to take effect and give me a better chance of survival.
Ya...I agree with your statements and consider Relenza to be more effective over Tamiflu...However; Tamiflu is also an effective drug and has proved itself at the time.
For more updates on Tamiflu and Relenza you may visit the following sites-
www.drugdelivery.ca/s33713-s-RELENZA.aspx;
www.fda.gov/cder/news/relenza/default.htm;
www.drugs.com/relenza.html etc.
Hoping you will find my idea helping/working.
______________
Kays

Wise Young
10-30-2005, 06:30 PM
I have been reading all these reports of avian influenza with increasing discomfort with the way scientists and media are exaggerating the danger. We have known for many years that influenza viruses come from birds and animals. Indeed, much of the vaccine development effort was based on early detection of such flu strains and vaccinating vulnerable populations against the flu. We have also known for many years that both the virulence and the deadliness of the virus declines as it passes from person to person. Even though it is possible for the flu to spread from bird to human, the vast majority of the population do not have such intimate contact with birds and pandemics are spread from human-to-human. The concept that we need to spend billions of dollars of Tamiflu or other anti-flu medication does not make sense.

Michael Leavitt, the Secretary of Health and Human Services, has been on the talk show circuit and had returned from trips to places like Vietnam and others. While he tells a fascinating story concerning how people are living with animals and birds in these countries, in my opinion, he is unnecessarily scaring the public with these stories and he is not providing sufficient background for people to understand what is going on. It is not good to stoke a national panic about this without a clear policy and program to handle the situation. Some of this panic, for example, has already resulted in the "termination" of millions of domestic fowl and may lead to unwarranted killing of wild fowl that may or may not be carrying the virus.

I am hoping Congress would authorize a National Academy of Science study of this situation and provide some practical recommendations concerning what to do. The current situation is unacceptable. If it is confusing to the doctors, it is causing wide-spread panic in the public. That should not be.

Wise.

Leif
01-05-2006, 10:07 AM
http://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/news/story.jsp?story=674818




By Geneviève Roberts
05 January 2006

A second Turkish teenager who tested positive for bird flu died today, the semi-official Anatolia news agency reported.

Turkey yesterday confirmed two human cases of bird flu, one of whom, a teenage boy, died on Sunday after developing pneumonia-like symptoms. His sister died in hospital early today, Anatolia reported.

If the cases - all three are siblings - are confirmed as being from the deadly H5N1 strain, they will be the first in people outside of South-east Asia in the current bird flu outbreak. The British Government says it is monitoring the situation.

The World Health Organisation said the strain of bird flu is most likely to be H5N1. More tests are taking place on samples which have been sent to Britain.

As eight more people were sent to hospital in eastern Turkey with severe pneumonia-like symptoms yesterday, the Health Minister, Recep Akdag, said: "Two patients have tested positive, and there is another suspected case."

More on link above.

carbar
01-19-2006, 06:38 AM
"There is no evidence that Tamiflu, the drug being stockpiled by Britain, the United States and Europe, will work if a flu pandemic takes off in humans, according to a review published today by the Lancet medical journal.

None of the four existing drugs against influenza has much effect, the paper says. The authors strongly warn against relying on drugs to stamp out a potential avian flu pandemic, saying complacency could get in the way of more useful public health measures - such as hygiene and isolation - to stop the spread of infection."

http://society.guardian.co.uk/health/news/0,,1689744,00.html


I also read a report recently about a clinical test involving domestic cats (which as a cat-lover does not make me happy). The cats, which if I remember rightly already had a respiratory infection, were fed meat from an H5N1 infected chicken. They later tested positive for the H5N1 virus. The purpose of the test being to see how easily the infection can go from bird to mammal (and by inference to human). None of it reassuring stuff.

carbar
02-08-2006, 07:39 AM
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/africa/4692916.stm

This is a worrying development. Where next?

carbar
02-11-2006, 12:38 PM
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/4704046.stm

bobbyg
02-11-2006, 02:58 PM
Wise--I agree that panic is not an approach that can have a beneficial outcome. Panic is never the answer. But we seem to have a group of people running much of the country (US) who seem to have fallen into a thoughtless habit of abusing our tendency to let fear get control of our heads and make us foolish. I really can't imagine why so many are going along with this--especially the media in the way things are reported.

To look at the overall and historical facts of flu epidemics and transmission is our best potential for behaving intelligently about this new strain, and now is the time to do that, before we are desperately overwhelmed by the developments we are hearing about.

Leif, Carbar, and others--do you see any articles or have news of people taking action to reduce panic and focus on solutions beyond antiviral medications? (Not that those are a bad thing, but since the best ones aren't yet developed for this strain, how are people creating protective programs for their areas/communities otherwise? Or maybe it's a bit early to be seeing evidence of this. What intelligent action can we take in the present time to not become exposed to this, or to minimize our risk?)

I love all you guys. You are doing such wonderful stuff here--I'm always heartened when I have some time to get on and read. Thanks! Tana

SCI-Nurse
02-12-2006, 01:03 PM
I have been considering for a while moving this to the Health & Science News forum since this is not particularily related to SCI care or health issues at this time. If we start to see human to human transmission, then it can always be moved back to the Care forum...when and if we know what to do about prevention or treatment (which is not currently the case).

(KLD)

bigbob
02-12-2006, 01:17 PM
I am hoping Congress would authorize a National Academy of Science study of this situation and provide some practical recommendations concerning what to do. The current situation is unacceptable. If it is confusing to the doctors, it is causing wide-spread panic in the public. That should not be.

Wise.

Dr. Young, I couldn't agree with you more! But, how could that happen when the same powers to be are promoting anti-cure legislation by not understanding the true situation with ESC research either? If you think the current administration could be fair, then, with all the pro-esc points that even you have suggested, we wouldn't be in the current situation of facing stem cell decoy bills.

Leif
02-12-2006, 01:20 PM
Wise--I agree that panic is not an approach that can have a beneficial outcome. Panic is never the answer. But we seem to have a group of people running much of the country (US) who seem to have fallen into a thoughtless habit of abusing our tendency to let fear get control of our heads and make us foolish. I really can't imagine why so many are going along with this--especially the media in the way things are reported.

To look at the overall and historical facts of flu epidemics and transmission is our best potential for behaving intelligently about this new strain, and now is the time to do that, before we are desperately overwhelmed by the developments we are hearing about.

Leif, Carbar, and others--do you see any articles or have news of people taking action to reduce panic and focus on solutions beyond antiviral medications? (Not that those are a bad thing, but since the best ones aren't yet developed for this strain, how are people creating protective programs for their areas/communities otherwise? Or maybe it's a bit early to be seeing evidence of this. What intelligent action can we take in the present time to not become exposed to this, or to minimize our risk?)

I love all you guys. You are doing such wonderful stuff here--I'm always heartened when I have some time to get on and read. Thanks! Tana
Tana,
The swans in Sicilia in Italy were birds coming back from the Black Sea. We (if) can expect more bird flue in birds when the migratory birds will be back again. There was earlier a lot of attention to this. The health department have been on TV along with other specialists in the field. The government says it has enough of Tamiflu on stock to cower the population in case an epidemic/pandemic (but will it work?). The government has also ordered that we here shall start to make medications and vaccines for it. But then again, it is difficult to make a vaccine for something that is not there (yet). I mean that it will first be a problem if or when it mutates. But the impression is that our government take the situation very serious, the same with EU. The situation is calm. Leif (and, no problem sci-nurse).

bobbyg
02-12-2006, 02:47 PM
I'm thinking something along the lines of how, if the virus is presently spread by feces dust stirred up in the air to breathe or by bodily fluids of birds (wild or domestic), is a public health education program to inform people to wear a face mask outdoors in areas where the virus might be, or to wash their hands coming indoors, as well as keeping the domestic chickens and ducks in the coop, of potential benefit to protecting ourselves from being infected? These are old-fashioned sanitation practices, of course, and do not address the issue of mutations and other possible sources of exposure, but given the knowledge we have about how people are getting sick right now, do you think these preventives are impractical? Maybe the populations at risk wouldn't follow these...or masks aren't available...?

I do see how the concern is for potential for this to mutate, and that is of course a larger issue. I'm glad for governments taking this seriously, also glad that people are taking a calm approach. Still, it often doesn't take much to begin a panic...maybe I'm thinking more about how we have behaved in my country in recent years! I create an image in my mind of American men out trying to kill every living thing with wings...but I'm not really THAT much of a cynic. Or...well, maybe a little. I hope we won't do it that way, though. I just hope that we will be more of our better selves about this and create a reasonable plan. Tana

Leif
02-15-2006, 05:34 PM
Dead Swans are also being tested in Sweden and Norway now. Here is a couple of news articles of today;



Bird flu alarm in Norway

Norway's Food Safety Authority called a crisis meeting after the discovery of a confirmed case of the dangerous H5N1 virus on the German island of Rügen in the Baltic Sea.

German authorities confirmed on Tuesday evening that tests from two dead swans revealed infection with the dangerous H5N1 strain of bird flu, which can infect and harm humans.

"There is no doubt that the risk has increased that we will find bird flu among wild birds in Norway," said Keren Bar-Yaacov, divisional director at the FSA. The FSA and the National Veterinary Institute held a crisis meeting on Wednesday morning.

Norway's FSA has reacted with a full alarm and has now forbidden the keeping of fowl outdoors in Oslo, Akershus, Østfold, Vestfold, Hedmark, Oppland, Buskerud and Rogaland counties, effective immediately.

"We will intensify our monitoring of birds. We must think safety first," Bar-Yaacov told Aftenposten.no. "I would advise people to take normal care with hygiene and to make sure to wash their hands if they come in contact with birds that behave abnormally," Bar-Yaacov said.

FSA director of health and hygiene Stein Ivar Ormsettrø said that there was no reason for concern and that the chance of human infection in Norway remains minimal.

German authorities said Tuesday evening that all fowl would be kept indoors from Feb. 20 until the end of April in an attempt to hinder an outbreak of bird flu as migratory birds return to Europe.

In recent days the H5N1 strain has been found in dead swans in Austria, Greece, Italy and Bulgaria.
Source (http://www.aftenposten.no/english/local/article1224565.ece)




New pandemic plan for bird flu

Norwegian health authorities are implementing a new preparedness plan for pandemic bird flu.

Norwegian authorities are escalating preparations to meet the possibility of the global spreading of bird flu. The Ministry of Health and Care Services has prepared a new pandemic plan that will be unveiled on Thursday morning.

Authorities are on full alert after a case of the dangerous H5N1 strain of bird flu was confirmed on the German island Rügen in the Baltic Sea.

Norwegian health authorities have wide-ranging powers in the event of a pandemic, and these are covered by the national contagion control act. In a given situation the Directorate for Health and Social Affairs can resolve to put bird flu on the list of contagious diseases endangering public health or safety and then legally force citizens into quarantine.

In such circumstances authorities could approve a ban on meetings and other gatherings, close day care centers and shops, isolate certain geographic areas and limit freedom of movement in other ways.

Citizens also bear certain responsibilities under the contagion control act.
Those who believe themselves infected are obliged to seek medical attention at once, provide information to determine source of infection, receive personal contagion control advice and to go into isolation if necessary.

The Ministry of Health and Care Services reports that an influenza pandemic would likely also result in a "public health emergency of international concern", which would activate the health regulations recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO).

The WHO has the primary responsibility for monitoring the development of bird flu and other similar global health threats.
Source (http://www.aftenposten.no/english/local/article1224937.ece)

carbar
02-18-2006, 12:09 PM
http://www.guardian.co.uk/birdflu/story/0,,1712541,00.html

carbar
02-20-2006, 05:32 AM
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/4721598.stm

......Vested interests mean wild birds are being blamed for the spread of avian flu, argues Dr Leon Bennun in this week's Green Room, whereas responsibility really lies with modern farming. Demands for culling and the destruction of nesting sites threaten, he says, to bring rare species to extinction, but will do nothing to halt the disease.......

.......Catching the culprits

The likelihood is that the swans now dying in Western Europe had recently arrived from the Black Sea, driven south and west by freezing conditions that prevented them feeding.

They may have caught the disease from other wild birds; but this is unlikely given the tens of thousands of waterfowl that have tested negative for H5N1 over the last decade.

Much more likely is that before starting out, they picked up the virus from farms, either from infected poultry or their faeces. Mute swans often graze agricultural fields, and are likely to have come into contact with poultry manure spread as a fertiliser.

If wild birds had been spreading the disease across continents there would have been trails of outbreaks following migration routes; but this hasn't happened.

The "wild bird" theory for the spread of H5N1 also provides no explanation as to why certain countries on flight paths of birds from Asia remain flu-free, whilst their neighbours suffer repeated infections.......

......Highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses are very rare in wild birds.
But in intensively farmed poultry, the high density of birds and constant exposure to faeces, saliva and other secretions provide ideal conditions for the replication, mutation, recombination and selection through which highly lethal forms can evolve.

Add to this repeated misdiagnosis, industry and government cover-ups, and panic selling or processing of potentially infected birds, and we have the explanation for why H5N1 is now endemic in parts of South-East Asia.

Factor in the global nature of the poultry industry, and the international movement of live poultry and poultry products both before and after the Asian outbreaks, and we have the most plausible mechanism for the spread of the virus between places which are not connected by the flyways of migratory birds.


more in article

carbar
02-22-2006, 08:27 AM
Health officials in Austria say a chicken has the deadly H5N1 bird flu virus - the first time the strain has appeared among poultry in the EU.

It comes as EU officials hold a second day of talks on whether to start vaccination programmes - a move favoured by France and the Netherlands.

Seven EU countries have now confirmed cases of H5N1 in wild birds.

Austria's health ministry said the chicken had been kept in a cage where an infected swan was also being held.

Commercial poultry stocks have not been affected, a health ministry spokeswoman said.

The swan had been taken to an animal sanctuary in Graz earlier this month from an area affected by the virus, she added, in breach of regulations imposed after the first H5N1 case was recorded in wild birds in Austria.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/4734748.stm

Leif
02-22-2006, 08:51 AM
Some scientists say we now better get used to the idea that wild birds do have bird flu and try to find ways to live with that. The other problem is also of course if it mutates.

carbar
02-25-2006, 05:06 PM
Just 200 km from the lake where 2 dead ducks were found, there now appears the first account of the H5N1 virus in domestic fowl.
Chirac attempts to calm the public, as poultry sales plummet by 30%

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/4750950.stm

carbar
03-02-2006, 05:57 AM
Now that a cat has been found with the H5N1 virus on an island in northern Germany, the government has ordered a cat curfew all over the country. The cat had most likely eaten raw infected poultry. But the spreading of the virus from bird to mammal is worrying.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/birdflu/story/0,,1721322,00.html

The cat with no name that everyone in Germany is talking about.....
http://www.guardian.co.uk/birdflu/story/0,,1721200,00.html


Does anyone know if H5N1 infects ALL birds that it comes into contact with? Or is it just hens, ducks, geese etc? What about pigeons - I mean they shit everywhere - so they could be a real danger in city environments.

carbar
03-03-2006, 08:44 AM
Animal disease
The aves, and ave nots

Avian influenza is spreading to many new countries. But migrating wild birds may not be the only culprits

IN AROUND a month, bird flu has appeared in a seemingly alarming number of new countries. The disease is already endemic in the poultry flocks of much of Asia. In the face of the relentless march of the H5N1 virus around the world, fatalism is not an appropriate response. Better to look at exactly what is going on.

The arrival of bird flu in Europe and its neighbourhood has caused most of the flap, yet the cases in Azerbaijan, Bulgaria, Greece, Italy, Slovenia, Iran, Austria, Germany, France, Hungary and Croatia are only in wild birds. In Nigeria, Egypt and India, the virus has been discovered to be widely distributed across poultry flocks.

While the presence of the virus in any form is a concern, Nigeria, Egypt and India face bigger problems coping with dense farmed avian populations, and they are less well equipped to deal with them. More significantly, it is increasingly apparent that the real and most immediate issue is to what extent wild birds, or humans themselves, are responsible for the infection's spread in poultry.

A research paper in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, published online on February 10th, shows that the H5N1 virus has persisted in its birthplace, southern China, for almost ten years and has been introduced into Vietnam on at least three occasions, and to Indonesia. The authors suggest that such transmissions are perpetuated mainly by the movement of poultry and poultry products, rather than by migrating birds.

This is significant because it strongly supports bird conservationists, who have been arguing that most outbreaks in South-East Asia can be linked to movements of poultry and poultry products, or infected material from poultry farms, such as mud on vehicles or people's shoes. Conservationists also argue that live animal markets have played an important role in the H5N1's spread. Such markets were the source of the first known outbreak in Hong Kong in 1997 when 20% of the chickens in live poultry markets were infected.

BirdLife International, a conservation group, reckons there are three likely transmission routes for H5N1: commercial trade and the movement of poultry; trade in wild birds; and the use of infected poultry manure as agricultural fertiliser. Bird conservationists add that although migratory birds can carry and transmit the virus, it is often not clear whether they picked up the infection from poultry.

In Nigeria, there is the suggestion that it was trade, and not migratory birds, that caused the outbreak. For one thing, the infection was first detected in a commercial farm with 46,000 poultry and not among backyard flocks which represent 60% of the country's poultry production—and which would be expected to have greater contact with wild birds.

The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) estimates Nigeria imports around 1.2m day-old chicks every year. Further, there are rumours that many of these chicks are still arriving from countries with domestic H5N1 infections, such as China and Turkey. Joseph Domenech, head of the animal health service at the FAO's headquarters in Rome, says the importation of chickens from contaminated countries is forbidden.

The Nigerian government is now taking action to eliminate the virus. Its challenge will be to get the message to ordinary Nigerians about the urgent need to cull birds, prevent poultry movement and disinfect farms. Dick Thompson, of the World Health Organisation, responded to a report that Nigerians had been seen retrieving dead chickens from a pit of culled birds by saying it was a “really scary activity and something not been seen before”.

Neighbouring countries are also moving into action. This week a meeting was held in Senegal to try to establish a regional strategy for containment. Money should be available. Last month $1.9 billion was pledged by countries and international groups for the fight against avian flu—half a billion more than expected, which underscores the extent to which the disease is seen as a global threat. Infection across Africa would increase the likelihood that the virus will mutate to become transmissible between humans. But there is another vital dimension: the loss of farm income and of a vital source of protein could also be devastating for Africa. That ought to be food for thought for Europeans worried about a few dead swans.

http://www.economist.com/science/displayStory.cfm?story_id=5545392

carbar
03-18-2006, 12:01 PM
A 30-year-old woman who died this week was Egypt's first human victim of bird flu, state television has said.
Reports said the woman, who maintained a domestic bird farm despite a ban on the practice, died of a fever at Cairo's main hospital on Friday.

Samples have been sent to the UK for further tests.

Egypt last month ordered the slaughter of all poultry kept in homes, as part of efforts to stop the spread of the H5N1 strain of the bird flu virus.

The H5N1 strain has killed at least 90 people since early 2003, mostly in South-East Asia.

The virus can infect humans in close contact with birds. There is still no evidence that it can be passed from human to human.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/4820714.stm

carbar
03-21-2006, 09:26 AM
The Bush administration warns that the United States is likely to get its first case of bird flu this year. Government wildlife and public health officials are stepping up the testing of migratory birds to detect any that might be carrying the deadly H5N1 avian influenza virus.
U.S. authorities have tested about 16,000 migratory birds for H5N1 since the disease first appeared in Hong Kong nine years ago, but they are vastly increasing their effort on the assumption that wild birds are the most likely way bird flu would enter the United States for the first time.

Interior Secretary Gale Norton says it is only a matter of time before this happens.

"It is increasingly likely that we will detect the highly pathogenic H5N1 strain of avian flu in birds within the U.S. borders, possibly as early as this year," said Gale Norton.

The bird flu early warning plan to which Norton and the chiefs of the U.S. agriculture and health departments have agreed will collect samples from 75,000 to 100,000 live and dead wild birds this year. They also plan to collect 50,000 samples of water or feces from high risk waterfowl habitats across the United States.

Norton says the emphasis will be on monitoring bird migration routes through Alaska and over the Pacific Ocean.

"If migratory birds carry the highly pathogenic H5N1 or similarly dangerous virus to the United States, it is most likely to arrive first via the Pacific Islands or Alaska," she said.

http://english.chosun.com/w21data/html/news/200603/200603210004.html

carbar
03-21-2006, 12:08 PM
Five people have died from the H5N1 strain of bird flu in Azerbaijan since February, the World Health Organization (WHO) has said.
Two other people had tested positive for bird flu during tests carried out at a British laboratory, the WHO said.

The latest deaths took the world's human toll to 103 since 2003, it said.

The H5N1 virus cannot pass easily from one person to another. But there are fears it could mutate, triggering a flu pandemic, experts warn.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/4830046.stm